The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 2,886 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3.
do not grieve for thy son.  There was another king of the name of Suhotra the son of Atithi.  We hear, O Srinjaya, that even he fell a prey to death.  During his rule, Maghavat showered gold for one whole year upon his kingdom.  Obtaining that king for her lord, the earth became in reality (and not in name only as before) Vasumati.[87] The rivers, during the sway of that king, bore golden tortoises, crabs, alligators, sharks, and porpoises, for the adorable Indra, O king, had showered these upon them.  Beholding those golden fishes and sharks and tortoises in hundreds and thousands, Atithi’s son became filled with wonder.  Collecting that vast wealth of gold that covered the earth, Suhotra performed a sacrifice at Kurujangala and gave it away unto the Brahmanas, When that king, O Srinjaya, who transcended thee in the four attributes of religious merit, knowledge, renunciation, and affluence, and who was purer than thy son, felt a prey to death, do not grieve for thy son (that is dead).  Thy son never performed a sacrifice and never made gifts.  Knowing this, pacify thy mind and do not give away to grief.[88] We hear also, O Srinjaya, that Vrihadratha the king of the Angas, fell a prey to death.  He gave away I hundred thousand steeds.  A hundred thousand maidens also, adorned with golden ornaments, he gave away as presents in a sacrifice he performed.  A hundred thousand elephants also of the best breed, he gave away as presents in another sacrifice performed by him.  A hundred millions also of bulls, adorned with golden chains, with thousands of kine accompanying them, he gave away as sacrificial presents.  While the king of Anga performed his sacrifice by the hill called Vishnupada, Indra became intoxicated with the Soma he drank, and the Brahmanas with the presents they received.  In the sacrifices, O monarch, numbering by hundreds, that this king performed of old, the presents he made far surpassed those ever made by the gods, the Gandharvas, and men.  No other man was born, or will ever be born, that gave or will give away so much wealth as was given away by the king of the Angas in the seven sacrifices he performed, each of which was characterised by the consecration of the Soma.[89] When, O Srinjaya, this Vrihadratha even, who was thy superior in the four attributes and who was purer than thy son, fell a prey to death, do not grieve for thy son that is dead.  We hear also, O Srinjaya, that Sivi, the son of Usinara, fell a prey to death.  That king swayed the whole earth as one sways the leathern shield in his hand.  Riding on a single car that proved victorious in every battle, king Sivi caused the whole earth to resound with the rattle of his wheels and subjugated all monarchs.[90] Usinara’s son Sivi gave away, in a sacrifice, all the kine and horses he had, both domestic and wild.  The Creator himself thought that no one amongst the kings of the past or the future had or would have the ability to bear the burthen, O Srinjaya, that Usinara’s son Sivi, that foremost of kings,
Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook