The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,984 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2.

Sanjaya said, “Thus urged by thy son, O great king, the mighty king of the Kalingas, accompanied by a large army advanced towards Bhima’s car.  And Bhimasena, then, O Bharata, supported by the Chedis, rushed towards that large and mighty army of the Kalingas, abounding with cars, steeds, and elephants, and armed with mighty weapons, and advancing towards him with Ketumat, the son of the king of the Nishadas.  And Srutayus also, excited with wrath, accoutred in mail, followed by his troops in battle-array, and, accompanied by king Ketumat, came before Bhima in battle.  And the ruler of the Kalingas with many thousands of cars, and Ketumat with ten thousand elephants and the Nishadas, surrounded Bhimasena, O king, on all sides.  Then the Chedis, the Matsyas, and Karushas, with Bhimasena at their head, with many kings impetuously rushed against the Nishadas.  And then commenced the battle, fierce and terrible, between the warriors rushing at one another from desire of slaughter.  And terrific was the battle that suddenly took place between Bhima and his foes, resembling the battle, O great king, between Indra and the mighty host of Diti’s sons.  And loud became the uproar, O Bharata, of that mighty army struggling in battle, that resembled the sound of the roaring ocean.  And the combatants, O king, cutting one another, made the whole field resemble a crematorium strewn with flesh and blood.  And combatants, impelled by the desire of slaughter could not distinguish friend from foe.  And those brave warriors, incapable of being easily defeated in battle, even began to strike down their own friend.  And terrific was the collision that took place between the few and many, between the Chedis (on the one side) and the Kalingas and the Nishadas, O king, (on the other).  Displaying their manliness to the best of their power, the mighty Chedis, abandoning Bhimasena, turned back, and when the Chedis ceased to follow him, the son of Pandu, encountering all the Kalingas, did not turn back, depending upon the might of his own arms.  Indeed, the mighty Bhimasena moved not, but from the terrace of his car covered the division of the Kalingas with showers of sharp arrows.  Then that mighty bowman, the king of the Kalingas, and that car-warrior, his son known by the name of Sakradeva, both began to strike the son of Pandu with their shafts.  And the mighty-armed Bhima, shaking his beautiful bow, and depending on the might of his own arms, fought with Kalinga, and Sakradeva, shooting in that battle innumerable arrows, slew Bhimasena’s steeds with them.  And beholding that chastiser of foes Bhimasena deprived of his car, Sakradeva rushed at him, shooting sharp arrows.  And upon Bhimasena, O great king, the mighty Sakradeva showered arrowy downpours like the clouds after summer is gone.  But the mighty Bhimasena, staying on his car whose steeds had been slain, hurled at Sakradeva a mace made of the hardest iron.  And slain by that mace, O king, the son of the ruler

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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