The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,984 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2.
water, wind, fire and firmament, planets, and stars, are liable to destruction.  All these, when the end of the universe cometh, take leave of the three worlds.  They are destroyed and created again and again.  Others also, such as men and animals and birds, and creatures belonging to other orders of living existence,—­indeed, all that move on this world of men,—­are endued with short lives.  And as regards kings, all of them, having enjoyed great prosperity, reach, at last, the hour of destruction and are reborn in order to enjoy the fruits of good and evil deeds.  It behoveth thee then to make peace with Yudhishthira.  Let the Pandavas and the Kauravas both rule this earth.  O Suyodhana, one should not think in this way, viz., I am strong!—­for O bull among men, it is seen that there are persons stronger than those generally regarded strong.  O son of Kuru’s race, physical strength is scarcely regarded as strength by those that are really strong.  As regards the Pandavas, endued as they all are with prowess equal to that of the celestials, they are also regarded as strong.  In this connection is cited an old story, as an example, the story, viz., of Matali searching for a bridegroom upon whom to bestow his daughter.  The king of the three worlds (Indra) had a charioteer, named Matali, whom he dearly loved.  Unto him was born a daughter celebrated over the world for beauty.  Endued with the celestial beauty, that daughter of Matali was known by the name of Gunakesi.  And, indeed, in both loveliness and symmetry of bodily figure, she far excelled other members of her sex.  Knowing that the time for giving her way had come, Matali with his wife became very anxious, thinking, O monarch, of what he was to do next.  And he thought within himself, ’Alas, the birth of a daughter in the families of those that are well-behaved and high-born and possess reputation and humility of character, is always attended with evil results.  Daughters, when born in respectable families, always endanger the honour of three families, viz., their maternal and paternal families and the family into which they are adopted by marriage.  Glancing in my mind’s eye the worlds of gods and men, I have searched both, but no eligible bridegroom have I found.’

“Kanwa continued, ’And it so happened that amongst the gods, the Daityas and Gandharvas, men and numerous Rishis, none was regarded by Matali as an eligible husband for his daughter.  And having held a consultation then in the night with his wife Sudharma, Matali set his heart upon making a journey to the world of the Nagas.  And he thought within himself, ’Amongst both gods and men I have not found a husband fit, in respect of beauty, for my Gunakesi.  Surely, one may be found amongst the Nagas.’  And saying this, he took his wife’s leave and sniffing the head of his daughter, Matali entered the nether regions.’”

SECTION XCVIII

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook