The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,984 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2.

“Sanat-sujata said, ’Though residing in and inherent to the mind, the knowledge of Brahman is still unmanifest.  It is by the aid of the pure intellect and Brahmacharya that, that knowledge is made manifest.  Indeed, having attained to that knowledge, Yogins forsake this world.  It is always to be found among eminent preceptors.  I shall now discourse to thee on that knowledge.’

“Dhritarashtra said, ’What should be the nature of that Brahmacharya by which the knowledge of Brahman might be attained without much difficulty?  O regenerate one, tell me this.’

“Sanat-sujata said, ’They, who, residing in the abodes of their preceptors and winning their good will and friendship, practise Brahmacharya austerities, become even in this world the embodiments of Brahman and casting off their bodies are united with the Supreme Soul.  They that in this world desirous of obtaining the state of Brahman, subdue all desires, and endued as they are with righteousness, they succeed in dissociating the Soul from the body like a blade projected from a clump of heath.  The body, O Bharata, is created by these, viz., the father and the mother; the (new) birth, however, that is due to the preceptor’s instructions is sacred, free from decrepitude, and immortal.  Discoursing upon Brahman and granting immortality, he who wraps all persons with (the mantle of) truth, should be regarded as father and mother; and bearing in mind the good he does, one should never do him any injury.  A disciple must habitually salute his preceptor with respect, and with purity (of body and mind) and well-directed attention, he must betake to study.  He must not consider any service as mean, and must not harbour anger.  Even this is the first step of Brahmacharya.  The practices of that disciple who acquires knowledge by observing the duties ordained for one of his class are regarded also as the first step of Brahmacharya.  A disciple should, with his very life and all his possessions, in thought, word and deed, do all that is agreeable to the preceptor.  This is regarded as the second step of Brahmacharya.  He should behave towards his preceptor’s wife and son also in the same way as towards his preceptor himself.  This also is regarded as the second step of Brahmacharya.  Bearing well in mind what has been done to him by the preceptor, and understanding also its object, the disciple should, with a delighted heart think,—­I have been taught and made great by him.  This is the third step of Brahmacharya.  Without requiring the preceptor by payment of the final gift, a wise disciple must not betake to another mode of life; nor should he say or even think of in his mind,—­I make this gift.  This is the fourth step of Brahmacharya.  He attaineth the first step of (knowledge of Brahman which is) the object of Brahmacharya by aid of time; the second step, through the preceptor’s prelections; the third, by the power of his own understanding; and finally, the fourth, by discussion.  The learned

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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