The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,984 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2.
proofs, knoweth also that which is sought to be proved.  But what that Object in its nature is (which is sought to be proved) is not known to either the Vedas or those that are acquainted with the Vedas.  For all that, however, those Brahmanas that are (truly) acquainted with the Vedas succeed in obtaining a knowledge of the Object knowable (by the Vedas) through the Vedas.  As the branch of a particular tree is sometimes resorted to for pointing out the lunar digit of the first day of the lighted fortnight so the Vedas are used for indicating the highest attributes of the Supreme Soul.  I know him to be a Brahmana (possessing a knowledge of Brahman) who expoundeth the doubts of others, having himself mastered all his own doubts, and who is possessed of the knowledge of Self.  One cannot find what the Soul is by seeking in the East, the South, the West, the North, or in the subsidiary directions or horizontally.  Very rarely can it be found in him who regardeth this body be to Self.  Beyond the conception of even the Vedas, the man of Yoga-meditation only can behold the Supreme.  Completely restraining all thy senses and thy mind also seek thou that Brahman which is known to reside in thy own Soul.  He is not a Muni who practiseth only Yoga-meditation; nor he who liveth only in the woods (having retired from the world).  He, however, is a Muni and is superior to all who knoweth his own nature.  In consequence of one’s being able to expound every object (Vyakarana), one is said to be endued with universal knowledge (Vaiyakarana); and, indeed, the science itself is called Vyakarana owing to its being able to expound every object to its very root (which is Brahman).  The man who beholdeth all the regions as present before his eyes, is said to be possessed of universal knowledge.  He that stayeth in Truth and knoweth Brahman is said to be a Brahmana, and a Brahmana, possesseth universal knowledge.  A Kshatriya also, that practises such virtues, may behold Brahman.  He may also attain to that high state by ascending step by step, according to what is indicated in the Vedas.  Knowing it for certain, I tell thee this.’”

SECTION XLIV

“Dhritarashtra said, ’Excellent, O Sanat-sujata, as this thy discourse is, treating of the attainment of Brahman and the origin of the universe.  I pray thee, O celebrated Rishi, to go on telling me words such as these, that are unconnected with objects of worldly desire and are, therefore, rare among men.’

“Sanat-sujata said, ’That Brahman about which thou askest me with such joy is not to be attained soon.  After (the senses have been restrained and) the will hath been merged in the pure intellect, the state that succeeds in one of utter absence of worldly thought.  Even that is knowledge (leading to the attainment of Brahman).  It is attainable only by practising Brahmacharya.’

“Dhritarashtra said, ’Thou sayest that the knowledge of Brahman dwelleth of itself in the mind, being only discovered by Brahmacharya; that is dwelling in the mind, it requires for its manifestation no efforts (such as are necessary for work) being manifested (of itself) during the seeking (by means of Brahmacharya).  How then is the immortality associated with the attainment of Brahman?’

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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