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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,984 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2.

“Sanat-sujata said, ’The fruits of virtue and of (perfect) inaction are both serviceable in that respect (i.e., for procuring emancipation).  Indeed, both are sure means for the attainment of emancipation.  The man, however, that is wise, achieveth success by knowledge (inaction).  On the other hand, the materialist acquireth merit (by action) and (as the consequence thereof) emancipation.  He hath also (in course of his pursuit) to incur sin.  Having obtained again fruits of both virtue and vice which are transitory, (heaven having its end as also hell in respect of the virtuous and the sinful), the man of action becometh once more addicted to action as the consequence of his own previous virtues and vices.  The man of action, however, who possesseth intelligence, destroyeth his sins by his virtuous acts.  Virtue, therefore, is strong, and hence the success of the man of action.’

“Dhritarashtra said, ’Tell me, according to their gradation, of those eternal regions that are said to be attainable, as the fruits of their own virtuous acts, by regenerate persons, engaged in the practice of virtue.  Speak unto me of others’ regions also of a similar kind.  O learned sire, I do not wish to hear of actions (towards which man’s heart naturally inclineth, however interdicted or sinful they may be).’

“Sanat-sujata said, ’Those regenerate persons that take pride in their Yoga practices, like strong men in their own strength, departing hence, shine in the region of Brahman.  Those regenerate persons that proudly exert in performing sacrifices and other Vedic rites, as the fruit of that knowledge which is theirs, in consequence of those acts, freed from this world, proceed to that region which is the abode of the deities.  There are others, again, conversant with the Vedas, who are of opinion that the performance of the sacrifices and rites (ordained by the Vedas) is obligatory (their non-performance being sinful).  Wedded to external forms, though seeking the development of the inner self (for they practise these rites for only virtue’s sake and not for the accomplishment of particular aims), these persons should not be regarded very highly (although some respect should be theirs).  Wherever, again, food and drink worthy of a Brahmana are abundant, like grass and reeds in a spot during the rainy season, there should the Yogin seek for his livelihood (without afflicting the householder of scanty means); by no means should he afflict his own self by hunger and thirst.  In a place, where there may be both inconvenience and danger to one, for one’s aversion, to disclose one’s superiority, he that doth not proclaim his superiority is better than he that doth.  The food offered by that person who is not pained at the sight of another disclosing his superiority, and who never eateth without offering the prescribed share to Brahmanas and guests, is approved by the righteous.  As a dog oftentimes devoureth its own evacuations to its injury, so those Yogins devour

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