The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,984 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2.

“Vidura said, ’Sleeplessness overtaketh thief, a lustful person, him that hath lost all his wealth, him that hath failed to achieve success, and him also that is weak and hath been attacked by a strong person.  I hope, O king, that none of these grave calamities have overtaken thee.  I hope, thou dost not grieve, coveting the wealth of others.’

“Dhritarashtra said, ’I desire to hear from thee words that are beneficial and fraught with high morality.  In this race of royal Rishis thou alone art reverenced by the wise.’  Vidura replied, ’King (Yudhishthira), graced with every virtue, is worthy of being the sovereign of the three worlds; yet, O Dhritarashtra, however worthy of being kept by thy side, he was exiled by thee.  Thou art, however, possessed of qualities which are thy very reverse of those possessed by him.  Although virtuous and versed in morality, thou hast yet no right to a share in the kingdom owing to thy loss of sight.  In consequence of his inoffensiveness and kindness, his righteousness, love of truth and energy, and his remembering the reverence that is due to thee, Yudhishthira patiently bears innumerable wrongs.  Having bestowed on Duryodhana and Suvala’s son and Karna, and Dussasana the management of the empire, how canst thou hope for prosperity?  He that is not served from the high ends of life by the aid of self-knowledge, exertion, forbearance and steadiness in virtue, is called wise.  These again are the marks of a wise man, viz., adherence to acts, worthy of praise and rejection of what is blamable, faith, and reverence.  He whom neither anger nor joy, nor pride, nor false modesty, nor stupefaction, nor vanity, can draw away from the high ends of life, is considered as wise.  He whose intended acts, and proposed counsels remain concealed from foes, and whose acts become known only after they have been done, is considered wise.  He whose proposed actions are never obstructed by heat or cold, fear of attachment, prosperity or adversity, is considered wise.  He whose judgment dissociated from desire, followeth both virtue and profit, and who disregarding pleasure chooseth such ends as are serviceable in both worlds, is considered wise.  They that exert to the best of their might, and act also to the best of their might, and disregard nothing as insignificant, are called wise.  He that understandeth quickly, listeneth patiently, pursueth his objects with judgment and not from desire and spendeth not his breath on the affairs of others without being asked, is said to possess the foremost mark of wisdom.  They that do not strive for objects that are unattainable, that do not grieve for what is lost and gone, that do not suffer their minds to be clouded amid calamities, are regarded to possess intellects endued with wisdom.  He who striveth, having commenced anything, till it is completed, who never wasteth his time, and who hath his soul under control, is regarded wise.  They that are wise, O bull of the Bharata race, always

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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