The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.
the Kurus, ruled the kingdom like his heroic great-grand-father (Yudhishthira).  And the ministers of the youthful monarch, beholding that he could now keep his enemies in check, went to Suvarnavarman, the king of Kasi, and asked him his daughter Vapushtama for a bride.  And the king of Kasi, after due inquiries, bestowed with ordained rites, his daughter Vapushtama on that mighty hero of Kuru race.  And the latter, receiving his bride, became exceedingly glad.  And he gave not his heart at any time to any other woman.  And gifted with great energy, he wandered in pursuit of pleasure, with a cheerful heart, on expanses of water and amid woods and flowery fields.  And that first of monarchs passed his time in pleasure as Pururavas of old did, on receiving the celestial damsel Urvasi.  Herself fairest of the fair, the damsel Vapushtama too, devoted to her lord and celebrated for her beauty having gained a desirable husband, pleased him by the excess of her affection during the period he spent in the pursuit of pleasure.’”

SECTION XLV

(Astika Parva continued)

“Meanwhile the great ascetic Jaratkaru wandered over the whole earth making the place where evening fell his home for the night.  And gifted with ascetic power, he roamed, practising various vows difficult to be practised by the immature, and bathing also in various sacred waters.  And the Muni had air alone for his food and was free from desire of worldly enjoyment.  And he became daily emaciated and grew lean-fleshed.  And one day he saw the spirits of his ancestors, heads down, in a hole, by a cord of virana roots having only one thread entire.  And that even single thread was being gradually eaten away by a large rat dwelling in that hole.  And the Pitris in that hole were without food, emaciated, pitiable, and eagerly desirous of salvation.  And Jaratkaru, approaching the pitiable one, himself in humble guise, asked them, ’Who are ye hanging by this cord of virana roots?  The single weak root that is still left in this cord of virana roots already eaten away by the rat, dwelling in this hole, is itself being gradually eaten away by the same rat with his sharp teeth.  The little that remains of that single thread will soon be cut away.  It is clear ye shall then have to fall down into this pit with faces downwards.  Seeing you with faces downwards, and overtaken by this great calamity, my pity hath been excited.  What good can I do to you.  Tell me quickly whether this calamity can be averted by a fourth, a third, or even by the sacrifice of a half of this my asceticism, O, relieve yourselves even with the whole of my asceticism.  I consent to all this.  Do ye as ye please.’

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook