The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 2,273 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.

Vaisampayana continued, “Being thus addressed by Bhima, the monkey with a smile showed him that form of his in which he had bounded over the main.  And wishing to gratify his brother, Hanuman assumed a gigantic body which (both) in length and breadth increased exceedingly.  And that monkey of immeasurable effulgence stood there, covering the plantain grove furnished with trees, and elevating himself to the height reached by the Vindhya.  And the monkey, having attained his lofty and gigantic body like unto a mountain, furnished with coppery eyes, and sharp teeth, and a face marked by frown, lay covering all sides and lashing his long tail.  And that son of the Kurus, Bhima, beholding that gigantic form of his brother, wondered, and the hairs of his body repeatedly stood on end.  And beholding him like unto the sun in splendour, and unto a golden mountain, and also unto the blazing firmament, Bhima closed his eyes.  Thereupon Hanuman addressed Bhima with a smile, saying, ’O sinless one, thou art capable of beholding my size up to this extent.  I can, however, go on swelling my size as long as I wish.  And, O Bhima, amidst foes, my size increaseth exceedingly by its own energy.’

Vaisampayana said, “Witnessing that dreadful and wonderful body of Hanuman, like unto the Vindhya mountain, the son of the wind-god became bewildered.  Then with his down standing erect, the noble-minded Bhima, joining his hands, replied unto Hanuman saying (there), ’O lord, by me have been beheld the vast dimensions of thy body.  Do thou (now), O highly powerful one, decrease thyself by thy own power.  Surely I cannot look at thee, like unto the sun risen, and of immeasurable (power), and irrepressible, and resembling the mountain Mainaka.  O hero, to-day this wonder of my heart is very great, that thou remaining by his side, Rama should have encountered Ravana personally.  Depending on the strength of thy arms, thou wert capable of instantly destroying Lanka, with its warriors, and horses, elephants and chariots.  Surely, O son of the wind-god, there is nothing that is incapable of being achieved by thee; and in fight, Ravana together with his followers was no match for thee single-handed.”

Vaisampayana continued, “Thus addressed by Bhima, Hanuman, the chief of monkeys, answered in affectionate words uttered in solemn accents.  “O mighty-armed one, O Bharata, it is even as thou sayest.  O Bhimasena, that worst of Rakshasas was no match for me.  But if I had slain Ravana—­that thorn of the worlds—­the glory of Raghu’s son would have been obscured;—­and for this it is that I left him alone.  By slaying that lord of the Rakshasas together with his followers, and bringing back Sita unto his own city, that hero hath established his fame among men.  Now, O highly wise one, being intent on the welfare of thy brothers, and protected by the wind-god, do thou go along a fortunate and auspicious way.  O foremost of the Kurus, this way will lead thee to the Saugandhika wood. (Proceeding in this

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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