Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.

“Lomasa continued, ’That monarch then represented unto them the equality of his expenditure and income, and said, ’Knowing this, take ye what ye desire.’  The Rishi, however, who saw both sides with equal eyes, beholding the equality of that monarch’s income with expenditure, thought that if he took anything under the circumstances, his act would result in injury to all creatures.  Agastya and Srutarvan, with king Vradhnaswa then went to Purokutsa’s son, Trasadasyu, of enormous wealth.  The high-souled Trasadasyu, learning of their arrival on the confines of his kingdom went out, O king, and received them well.  And that best of monarchs in Ikshvaku’s line, having worshipped all of them duly, enquired after the reason of their arrival.  And Agastya answered, ’O lord of earth, know that we have all come to thee, desirous of wealth.  Give us what you can, without injuring others.’”

“Lomasa continued, ’That monarch then, represented unto them the equality of his income with expenditure, and said, ’Knowing this, take ye what ye desire.’  Beholding, however, the equality of that monarch’s expenditure with income, the Rishi who saw both sides with equal eyes, thought that if he took anything under the circumstances, his act would result in injury to all creatures.  Then, O monarch, all those kings looking at one another, together spoke unto the Rishis saying, ’O Brahmana, there is a Danava of the name Ilwala who of all persons on earth, is possessed of enormous wealth.  Let us all approach him to-day and beg wealth of him.’”

“Lomasa continued, ’This suggestion, O king, of begging wealth of Ilwala appeared to them to be proper.  And, O monarch, all of them went together to Ilwala after this!’”

SECTION XCIX

“Lomasa said, ’When Ilwala learnt that those kings along with the great Rishi had arrived on the confines of his domain, he went out with his ministers and worshipped them duly.  And that prince of Asuras received them hospitably, entertaining them, O son of the Kuru race, with well dressed meat supplied by his brother Vatapi (transformed into a ram).  Then all those royal sages, beholding the mighty Asura Vatapi, who had been transformed into a ram thus cooked for them, became sad and cheerless and were nearly deprived of themselves.  But that best of Rishis—­Agastya—­addressing those royal sages, said, ’Yield ye not to grief, I will eat up the great Asura.’  And the mighty Rishi then sat himself down on an excellent seat, and the prince of Asuras, Ilwala, began to distribute the food smilingly.  And Agastya ate up the whole of the meat supplied by Vatapi (transformed into a ram).  And after the dinner was over, Ilwala began to summon his brother.  But thereupon a quantity of air alone came out of the illustrious Rishi’s stomach, with a sound that was as loud, O child, as the roar of the clouds.  And Ilwala repeatedly said, ‘Come out, O Vatapi!’ Then that best

Follow Us on Facebook