The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.
seek thy aid in ruling the earth or my capital,—­O best of monarchs, forsaken by king Dhritarashtra, I come to thee for tendering good counsel.  What I had said in the open court, I will now repeat unto thee.  Listen, and bear my words in mind,—­that wise man who bearing all the gross wrong heaped upon him by his enemies, patiently bideth his time, and multiplieth his resources “even as men by degrees turn a small fire:  into a large one, ruleth alone this entire earth.  He that (in prosperity) enjoyeth his substance with his adherents findeth in them sharers of his adversity,—­this is the best means of securing adherents, and it is said that he that hath adherents, winneth the sovereignty of the world!  And, O Pandava, divided thy prosperity with thy adherents, behave truthfully towards them, and converse with them agreeably!  Share also your food with them!  And never boast thyself in their presence!  This behaviour increaseth the prosperity of kings!’

“Yudhishthira said, ’Having recourse to such high intelligence, undisturbed by passion, I will do as thou counsellest!  And whatever else thou mayst counsel in respect of time and place, I will carefully follow entirely.’”

SECTION VI

“Vaisampayana said, ’O king, after Vidura had gone to the abode of the Pandavas, Dhritarashtra, O Bharata, of profound wisdom, repented of his action.  And thinking of the great intelligence of Vidura in matters connected with both war and peace, and also of the aggrandisement of the Pandavas in the future, Dhritarashtra, pained at the recollection of Vidura, having approached the door of the hall of state fell down senseless in the presence of the monarchs (in waiting) And regaining consciousness, the king rose from the ground and thus addressed Sanjaya standing by, ’My brother and friend is even like the god of justice himself!  Recollecting him today, my heart burneth in grief!  Go, bring unto me without delay my brother well-versed in morality!’ Saying this, the monarch wept bitterly.  And burning in repentance, and overwhelmed with sorrow at the recollection of Vidura, the king, from brotherly affection, again addressed Sanjaya saying, ’O Sanjaya, go thou and ascertain whether my brother, expelled by my wretched self through anger, liveth still!  That wise brother of mine of immeasurable intelligence hath never been guilty of even the slightest transgression, but, on the other hand, he it is who hath come by grievous wrong at my hands!  Seek him, O wise one, and bring him hither; else, O Sanjaya, I will lay down my life!”

“Vaisampayana continued, ’Hearing these words of the king, Sanjaya expressed his approbation, and saying ‘So be it,’ went in the direction of the Kamyaka woods.  And arriving without loss of time at the forest where the sons of Pandu dwelt, he beheld Yudhishthira clad in deer-skin, seated with Vidura, in the midst of Brahmanas by thousands and guarded by his brothers, even like Purandara in the

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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