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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.

Vaisampayana continued,—­“Although (a living) animal made of gold was an impossibility, yet Rama suffered himself to be tempted by a (golden) deer.  Indeed, the minds of men over whom calamities hang, became deranged and out of order.  Yudhishthira, therefore, having said these words, retraced his steps along with his brothers.  And knowing full well the deception practised by Sakuni, the son of Pritha came back to sit at dice with him again.  These mighty warriors again entered that assembly, afflicting the hearts of all their friends.  And compelled by Fate they once more sat down at ease for gambling for the destruction of themselves.”

“Sakuni then said,—­’The old king hath given ye back all your wealth.  That is well.  But, O bull of the Bharata race, listen to me, there is a stake of great value.  Either defeated by ye at dice, dressed in deer skins we shall enter the great forest and live there for twelve years passing the whole of the thirteenth year in some inhabited region, unrecognised, and if recognised return to an exile of another twelve years; or vanquished by us, dressed in deer skins ye shall, with Krishna, live for twelve years in the woods passing the whole of the thirteenth year unrecognised, in some inhabited region.  If recognised, an exile of another twelve years is to be the consequence.  On the expiry of the thirteenth year, each is to have his kingdom surrendered by the other.  O Yudhishthira, with this resolution, play with us, O Bharata, casting the dice.’

“At these words, they that were in that assembly, raising up their arms said in great anxiety of mind, and from the strength of their feelings these words,—­’Alas, fie on the friends of Duryodhana that they do not apprise him of his great danger.  Whether he, O bull among the Bharatas, (Dhritarashtra) understandeth or not, of his own sense, it is thy duty to tell him plainly.”

“Vaisampayana continued,—­King Yudhishthira, even hearing these various remarks, from shame and a sense of virtue again sat at dice.  And though possessed of great intelligence and fully knowing the consequences, he again began to play, as if knowing that the destruction of the Kurus was at hand.

“And Yudhishthira said,—­’How can, O Sakuni, a king like me, always observant of the uses of his own order, refuse, when summoned to dice?  Therefore I play with thee.”

“Sakuni answered,—­’We have many kine and horses, and milch cows, and an infinite number of goats and sheep; and elephants and treasures and gold and slaves both male and female.  All these were staked by us before but now let this be our one stake, viz., exile into the woods,—­being defeated either ye or we will dwell in the woods (for twelve years) and the thirteenth year, unrecognised, in some inhabited place.  Ye bulls among men, with this determination, will we play.”

“O Bharata, this proposal about a stay in the woods was uttered but once.  The son of Pritha, however, accepted it and Sakuni took up the dice.  And casting them he said unto Yudhishthira,—­’Lo, I have won.”

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