The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.
desire of profit, even like the king in story.  For then, blinded by folly thou wilt have to repent afterwards, even like the person that killed the birds.  Like a flower-seller that plucketh (many flowers) in the garden from trees that he cherisheth with affection from day to day, continue, O Bharata, to pluck flowers day by day from the Pandavas.  Do not scorch them to their roots like a fire-producing breeze that reduceth everything to black charcoal.  Go not, O king, unto the region of Yama, with thy sons and troops, for who is there that is capable of fighting with the sons of Pritha, together?  Not to speak of others, is the chief of the celestials at the head of the celestials themselves, capable of doing so?”

SECTION LXII

“Vidura said,—­“Gambling is the root of dissensions.  It bringeth about disunion.  Its consequences are frightful.  Yet having recourse to this, Dhritarashtra’s son Duryodhana createth for himself fierce enmity.  The descendants of Pratipa and Santanu, with their fierce troops and their allies the Vahlikas, will, for the sins of Duryodhana meet with destruction.  Duryodhana, in consequence of this intoxication, forcibly driveth away luck and prosperity from his kingdom, even like an infuriate bull breaking his own horns himself.  That brave and learned person who disregarding his own foresight, followeth, O king, (the bent of) another man’s heart, sinketh in terrible affliction even like one that goeth into the sea in a boat guided by a child.  Duryodhana is gambling with the son of Pandu, and thou art in raptures that he is winning.  And it is such success that begeteth war, which endeth in the destruction of men.  This fascination (of gambling) that thou has well-devised only leadeth to dire results.  Thus hast thou simply brought on by these counsels great affliction to thy heart.  And this thy quarrel with Yudhishthira, who is so closely related to thee, even if thou hadst not foreseen it, is still approved by thee.  Listen, ye sons of Santanu, ye descendants of Pratipa, who are now in this assembly of the Kauravas, to these words of wisdom.  Enter ye not into the terrible fire that hath blazed forth following the wretch.  When Ajatasatru, the son of Pandu, intoxicated with dice, giveth way to his wrath, and Vrikodara and Arjuna and the twins (do the same), who, in that hour of confusion, will prove your refuge?  O great king, thou art thyself a mine of wealth.  Thou canst earn (by other means) as much wealth as thou seekest to earn by gambling.  What dost thou gain by winning from the Pandavas their vast wealth?  Win the Pandavas themselves, who will be to thee more than all the wealth they have.  We all know the skill of Suvala in play.  This hill-king knoweth many nefarious methods in gambling.  Let Sakuni return whence he came.  War not, O Bharata, with the sons of Pandu!’

SECTION LXIII

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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