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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.

“Duryodhana replied,—­O uncle, beholding this whole earth owning the sway of Yudhishthira in consequence of the might of the illustrious Arjuna’s weapons and beholding also that sacrifice of the son of Pritha like unto the sacrifice of Sakra himself of great glory among the celestials, I, being filled with jealousy and burning day and night, am being dried up like a shallow tank in the summer season.  Behold, when Sisupala was slain by the chief of the Satwatas, there was no man to take the side of Sisupala.  Consumed by the fire of the Pandava, they all forgave that offence; otherwise who is there that could forgive it?  That highly improper act of grave consequence done by Vasudeva succeeded in consequence of the power of the illustrious son of Pandu.  And so many monarchs also brought with them various kinds of wealth for king Yudhishthira, the son of Kunti, like tribute-paying Vaisyas!  Beholding Yudhishthira’s prosperity of such splendour, my heart burneth, efflicted with jealously, although it behoveth me not to be jealous.’

“Having reflected in this way, Duryodhana, as if burnt by fire, addressed the king of Gandhara again and said,—­’I shall throw myself upon a flaming fire or swallow poison or drown myself in water.  I cannot live.  What man is there in the world possessed of vigour who can bear to see his foes in the enjoyment of prosperity and himself in destitution?  Therefore I who bear to see that accession of prosperity and fortune (in my foes) am neither a woman nor one that is not a woman, neither also a man nor one that is not a man.  Beholding their sovereignty over the world and vast affluence, as also that sacrifice, who is there like me that would not smart under all that?  Alone I am incapable of acquiring such royal prosperity; nor do I behold allies that could help me in the matter.  It is for this that I am thinking of self-destruction.  Beholding that great and serene prosperity of the son of Kunti, I regard Fate as supreme and exertions fruitless.  O son of Suvala, formerly I strove to compass his destruction.  But baffling all my efforts he hath grown in prosperity even like the lotus from within a pool of water.  It is for this that I regard Fate as supreme and exertions fruitless.  Behold, the sons of Dhritarashtra are decaying and the sons of Pritha are growing day by day.  Beholding that prosperity of the Pandavas, and that assembly house of theirs, and those menials laughing at me, my heart burneth as if it were on fire.  Therefore, O uncle, know me now as deeply grieved and filled with jealousy, and speak of it to Dhritarashtra.

SECTION XLVII

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