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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.
to my relatives, for both Kansa and Sunaman were slain by me assisted by Rama.  But after the immediate cause of fear was removed (by the death of Kansa), Jarasandha, his father-in-law, took up arms.  Ourselves consisting of the eighteen younger branches of the Yadavas arrived at the conclusion that even if we struck our enemies continually with excellent weapons capable of taking the lives of the foes, we should still be unable to do anything unto him even in three hundred years.  He hath two friends that are like unto the immortals, and in point of strength the foremost of all men endued with might.  They are called Hansa and Dimvaka who are both incapable of being slain by weapons.  The mighty Jarasandha, being united with them, becomes incapable, I think, of being vanquished by even the three worlds.  O thou foremost of all intelligent men, this is not our opinion alone but all other kings also are of the same mind.  There lived, O monarch, a king of the name of Hansa, who was slain by Rama (Valadeva) after a battle of eighteen days.  But, O Bharata, hearing people say that Hansa had been killed, Dimvaka, O king, thought that he could not live without Hansa.  He accordingly jumped into the waters of the Yamuna and killed himself.  Afterwards when Hansa, the subjugator of hostile heroes, heard that Dimvaka, had killed himself, he went to the Yamuna and jumped into its waters.  Then, O bull of the Bharata race, king Jarasandha, hearing that both Hansa and Dimvaka had been killed, returned to his kingdom with an empty heart.  After Jarasandha had returned, O slayer of all foes, we were filled with pleasure and continued to live at Mathura.  Then the widow of Hansa and the daughter of Jarasandha, that handsome woman with eyes like lotus-petals, grieved at the death of her lord, went unto her father, and repeatedly urged, O Monarch, the king of Magadha, saying,—­O slayer of all foes, kill thou the slayer of my husband.—­Then, O great king, remembering the conclusion to which we had come of old we became exceedingly cheerless and fled from Mathura.  Dividing our large wealth into small portions so as to make each portion easily portable, we fled from fear of Jarasandha, with our cousins and relatives.  Reflecting upon everything, we fled towards the west.  There is a delightful town towards the west called Kusasthali, adorned by the mountains of Raivata.  In that city, O monarch, we took up our abode.  We rebuilt its fort and made it so strong that it has become impregnable even to the Gods.  And from within it even the women might fight the foe, what to speak of the Yadava heroes without fear of any kind?  O slayer of all foes, we are now living in that city.  And, O tiger of the Kuru race, considering the inaccessibility of that first of mountains and regarding themselves as having already crossed the fear of Jarasandha, the descendants of Madhu have become exceedingly glad.  Thus, O king, though possessed of strength and energy, yet from the oppressions of Jarasandha we have been
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