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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.
they shrieked aloud and beheld not anyone that could protect them.  Viswamitra, beholding this wonderful feat that resulted from Brahmana prowess, became disgusted with Kshatriya prowess and said, ’O, fie on Kshatriya prowess!  Brahmana prowess is true prowess!  In judging of strength and weakness, I see that asceticism is true strength.’  Saying this, the monarch, abandoning his large domains and regal splendour and turning his back upon all pleasures, set his mind on asceticism.  Crowned with success in asceticism and filling the three worlds with the heat of his ascetic penances, he afflicted all creatures and finally became a Brahmana.  The son of Kusika at last drank Soma with Indra himself (in Heaven).’”

SECTION CLXXVIII

(Chaitraratha Parva continued)

“The Gandharva continued, ’There was, O Partha, a king in this world, named Kalmashapada, who was of the race of Ikshvaku and was unequalled on earth for prowess.  One day the king went from his capital into the woods for purposes of hunting, and this grinder of foes pierced (with his arrows) many deer and wild boars.  And in those deep woods the king also slew many rhinoceroses.  Engaged in sport for some length of time, the monarch became very much fatigued and at last he gave up the chase, desiring to rest awhile.

“The great Viswamitra, endued with energy, had, a little while ago, desired to make that monarch his disciple.  As the monarch, afflicted with hunger and thirst, was proceeding through the woods, he came across that best of Rishis, the illustrious son of Vasishtha, coming along the same path.  The king ever victorious in battle saw that Muni bearing the name of Saktri, that illustrious propagator of Vasishtha’s race, the eldest of the high-souled Vasishtha’s hundred sons, coming along from opposite direction.  The king, beholding him said, ‘Stand out of our way.’  The Rishi, addressing the monarch in a conciliatory manner, said unto him sweetly, ’O king, this is my way.  This is the eternal rule of morality indicated in every treatise on duty and religion, viz., that a king should ever make way for Brahmanas.’  Thus did they address each other respecting their right of way.  ‘Stand aside, stand aside’, were the words they said unto each other.  The Rishi, who was in the right, did not yield, nor did the king yield to him from pride and anger.  That best of monarchs, enraged at the Rishi, refusing to yield him the way, acted like a Rakshasa, striking him with his whip.  Thus whipped by the monarch, that best of Rishis, the son of Vasishtha, was deprived of his senses by anger, and speedily cursed that first of monarchs, saying, ’O worst of kings, since thou persecutest like a Rakshasa an ascetic, thou shalt from this day, became a Rakshasa subsisting on human flesh!  Hence, thou worst of kings! thou shalt wander over the earth, affecting human form!’ Thus did the Rishi Sakti, endued with great prowess, speak unto king Kalmashapada. 

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