The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.

SECTION CLV

(Hidimva-vadha Parva continued)

“Vaisampayana said, ’Hidimva, the chief of the Rakshasas, seeing that his sister returned not soon enough, alighted from the tree, proceeded quickly to the spot where the Pandavas were.  Of red eyes and strong arms and the arms and the hair of his head standing erect, of large open mouth and body like unto a mass of dark clouds, teeth long and sharp-pointed, he was terrible to behold.  And Hidimva, beholding her brother of frightful visage alight from the tree, became very much alarmed, and addressing Bhima said, ’The wicked cannibal is coming hither in wrath.  I entreat thee, do with thy brothers, as I bid thee.  O thou of great courage, as I am endued with the powers of a Rakshasa, I am capable of going whithersoever I like.  Mount ye on my hips, I will carry you all through the skies.  And, O chastiser of foes, awaken these and thy mother sleeping in comfort.  Taking them all on my body, I will convey you through the skies.’

“Bhima then said, ’O thou of fair hips, fear not anything.  I am sure that as long as I am here, there is no Rakshasa capable of injuring any of these, O thou of slender waist.  I will slay this (cannibal) before thy very eyes.  This worst of Rakshasas, O timid one, is no worthy antagonist of mine, nor can all the Rakshasas together bear the strength of my arms.  Behold these strong arms of mine, each like unto the trunk of an elephant.  Behold also these thighs of mine like unto iron maces, and this broad and adamantine chest.  O beautiful one, thou shall today behold my prowess like unto that of Indra.  O thou of fair hips, hate me not, thinking that I am a man.’

“Hidimva replied saying, ’O tiger among men, O thou of the beauty of a celestial, I do not certainly hold thee in contempt.  But I have seen the prowess that Rakshasas exert upon men.’

“Vaisampayana continued, ’Then, O Bharata, the wrathful Rakshasa eating human flesh heard these words of Bhima who had been talking in that way.  And Hidimva beheld his sister disguised in human form, her head decked with garlands of flowers and her face like the full moon and her eyebrows and nose and eyes and ringlets all of the handsomest description, and her nails and complexion of the most delicate hue, and herself wearing every kind of ornament and attired in fine transparent robes.  The cannibal, beholding her in that charming human form, suspected that she was desirous of carnal intercourse and became indignant.  And, O best of the Kurus, becoming angry with his sister, the Rakshasa dilated his eyes and addressing her said, ’What senseless creature wishes to throw obstacles in my path now that I am so hungry?  Hast thou become so senseless, O Hidimva, that thou fearest not my wrath?  Fie on thee, thou unchaste woman!  Thou art even now desirous of carnal intercourse and solicitous of doing me an injury.  Thou art ready to sacrifice the good name and honour of all the Rakshasas, thy ancestors!  Those with whose aid thou wouldst do me this great injury, I will, even now, slay along with thee.’  Addressing his sister thus, Hidimva, with eyes red with anger and teeth pressing against teeth, ran at her to kill her then and there.  But beholding him rush at his sister, Bhima, that foremost of smiter, endued with great energy, rebuked him and said, Stop—­Stop!”

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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