The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.

“Vaisampayana said,” As the mighty Bhima proceeded, the whole forest with its trees and their branches seemed to tremble, in consequence of their clash with his breast.  The motion of his thighs raised a wind like unto that which blows during the months of Jyaishtha and Ashadha (May and June).  And the mighty Bhima proceeded, making a path for himself, but treading down the trees and creepers before him.  In fact, he broke (by the pressure of his body) the large trees and plants, with their flowers and fruits, standing on his way.  Even so passeth through the woods breaking down mighty trees, the leader of a herd of elephants, of the age of sixty years, angry and endued with excess of energy, during the season of rut when the liquid juice trickle down the three parts of his body.  Indeed, so great was the force with which Bhima endued with the speed of Garuda or of Marut (the god of wind), proceeded that the Pandavas seemed to faint in consequence.  Frequently swimming across streams difficult of being crossed, the Pandavas disguised themselves on their way from fear of the sons of Dhritarashtra.  And Bhima carried on his shoulder his illustrious mother of delicate sensibilities along the uneven banks of rivers.  Towards the evening, O bull of Bharata’s race, Bhima (bearing his brothers and mother on his back) reached a terrible forest where fruits and roots and water were scarce and which resounded with the terrible cries of birds and beasts.  The twilight deepened the cries of birds and beasts became fiercer, darkness shrouded everything from the view and untimely winds began to blow that broke and laid low many a tree large and small and many creepers with dry leaves and fruits.  The Kaurava princes, afflicted with fatigue and thirst, and heavy with sleep, were unable to proceed further.  They then all sat down in that forest without food and drink.  Then Kunti, smitten with thirst, said unto her sons, ’I am the mother of the five Pandavas and am now in their midst.  Yet I am burning with thirst!’ Kunti repeatedly said this unto her sons.  Hearing these words, Bhima’s heart, from affection for his mother, was warmed by compassion and he resolved to go (along as before).  Then Bhima, proceeding through that terrible and extensive forest without a living soul, saw a beautiful banian tree with widespreading branches.  Setting down there his brothers and mother, O bull of Bharata’s race; he said unto them, ’Rest you here, while I go in quest of water.  I hear the sweet cries of aquatic fowls.  I think there must be a large pool here.’  Commanded, O Bharata, by his elder brother who said unto him, ‘Go’, Bhima proceeded in the direction whence the cries of those aquatic fowls were coming.  And, O bull of Bharata’s race, he soon came upon a lake and bathed and slaked his thirst.  And affectionate unto his brothers, he brought for them, O Bharata, water by soaking his upper garments.  Hastily retracing his way over those four miles he came unto where his mother was and beholding her he was afflicted

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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