The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.
not come, so long only shall thou act as if thou art afraid.  But when it hath overtaken thee, thou must grapple with it courageously.  He who trusteth in a foe who hath been brought under subjection by force, summoneth his own death as a crab by her act of conception.  Thou shouldst always reckon the future act as already arrived (and concert measures for meeting it), else, from want of calmness caused by haste, thou mayest overlook an important point in meeting it when it is before thee.  A person desirous of prosperity should always exert with prudence, adopting his measures to time and place.  He should also act with an eye to destiny as capable of being regulated by mantras and sacrificial rites; and to virtue, wealth, and pleasure.  It is well-known that time and place (if taken into consideration) always produce the greatest good.  If the foe is insignificant, he should not yet be despised, for he may soon grow like a palmyra tree extending its roots or like a spark of fire in the deep woods that may soon burst into an extensive conflagration.  As a little fire gradually fed with faggots soon becometh capable of consuming even the biggest blocks, so the person who increaseth his power by making alliances and friendships soon becometh capable of subjugating even the most formidable foe.  The hope thou givest unto thy foe should be long deferred before it is fulfilled; and when the time cometh for its fulfilment, invent some pretext for deferring it still.  Let that pretext be shown as founded upon some reason, and let that reason itself be made to appear as founded on some other reason.  Kings should, in the matter of destroying their foes, ever resemble razors in every particular; unpitying as these are sharp, hiding their intents as these are concealed in their leathern cases, striking when the opportunity cometh as these are used on proper occasions, sweeping off their foes with all their allies and dependants as these shave the head or the chin without leaving a single hair.  O supporter of the dignity of the Kurus, bearing thyself towards the Pandavas and others also as policy dictateth, act in such a way that thou mayest not have to grieve in future.  Well do I know that thou art endued with every blessing, and possessed of every mark of good fortune.  Therefore, O king, protect thyself from the sons of Pandu!  O king, the sons of Pandu are stronger than their cousins (thy sons); therefore, O chastiser of foes, I tell thee plainly what thou shouldst do.  Listen to it, O king, with thy children, and having listened to it, exert yourselves (to do the needful).  O king, act in such a way that there may not be any fear for thee from the Pandavas.  Indeed, adopt such measures consonant with the science of policy that thou mayest not have to grieve in the future.’

“Vaisampayana continued, ’Having delivered himself thus Kanika returned to his abode, while the Kuru king Dhritarashtra became pensive and melancholy.’”

SECTION CXLIII

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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