The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.

“Vaisampayana said, ’At that very moment, seated on a golden seat, with parched paddy and with flowers and water-pots and much gold, the mighty warrior Karna was installed king by Brahmanas versed in mantras.  And the royal umbrella was held over his head, while Yak-tails waved around that redoubtable hero of graceful mien.  And the cheers, having ceased, king (Karna) said unto the Kaurava Duryodhana, ’O tiger among monarchs, what shall I give unto thee that may compare with thy gift of a kingdom?  O king, I will do all thou biddest!’ And Suyodhana said unto him, ’I eagerly wish for thy friendship.’  Thus spoken to, Karna replied, ’Be it so.’  And they embraced each other in joy, and experienced great happiness.’”

SECTION CXXXIX

(Sambhava Parva continued)

“Vaisampayana said, ’After this, with his sheet loosely hanging down, Adhiratha entered the lists, perspiring and trembling, and supporting himself on a staff.

“Seeing him, Karna left his bow and impelled by filial regard bowed down his head still wet with the water of inauguration.  And them the charioteer, hurriedly covering his feet with the end of his sheet, addressed Karna crowned with success as his son.  And the charioteer embraced Karna and from excess of affection bedewed his head with tears, that head still wet with the water sprinkled over it on account of the coronation as king of Anga.  Seeing the charioteer, the Pandava Bhimasena took Karna for a charioteer’s son, and said by way of ridicule, ’O son of a charioteer, thou dost not deserve death in fight at the hands of Partha.  As befits thy race take thou anon the whip.  And, O worst of mortals, surely thou art not worthy to sway the kingdom of Anga, even as a dog doth not deserve the butter placed before the sacrificial fire.’  Karna, thus addressed, with slightly quivering lips fetched a deep sigh, looked at the God of the day in the skies.  And even as a mad elephant riseth from an assemblage of lotuses, the mighty Duryodhana rose in wrath from among his brothers, and addressed that performer of dreadful deeds, Bhimasena, present there, ’O Vrikodara, it behoveth thee not to speak such words.  Might is the cardinal virtue of a Kshatriya, and even a Kshatriya of inferior birth deserveth to be fought with.  The lineage of heroes, like the sources of a lordly river, is ever unknown.  The fire that covereth the whole world riseth from the waters.  The thunder that slayeth the Danavas was made of a bone of (a mortal named) Dadhichi.  The illustrious deity Guha, who combines in his composition the portions of all the other deities is of a lineage unknown.  Some call him the offspring of Agni; some, of Krittika, some, of Rudra, and some of Ganga.  It hath been heard by us that persons born in the Kashatriya order have become Brahmanas.  Viswamitra and others (born Kshatriyas) have obtained the eternal Brahma.  The foremost of all wielders of weapons, the preceptor

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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