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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.

“Some time after, Pandu again requested Kunti on behalf of Madri.  Addressed, O king, by her lord in private, Kunti replied, ’Having given her the formula of invocation only once, she hath, O king, managed to obtain two sons.  Have I not been thus deceived by her, I fear, O king, that she will soon surpass me in the number of her children.  This, indeed, is the way of all wicked women.  Fool that I was, I did not know that by invoking the twin gods I could obtain at one birth twin children.  I beseech thee, O king, do not command me any further.  Let this be the boon granted (by thee) to me.’

“Thus, O king, were born unto Pandu five sons who were begotten by celestials and were endued with great strength, and who all lived to achieve great fame and expand the Kuru race.  Each bearing every auspicious mark on his person, handsome like Soma, proud as the lion, well-skilled in the use of the bow, and of leonine tread, breast, heart, eyes, neck and prowess, those foremost of men, resembling the celestials themselves in might, began to grow up.  And beholding them and their virtues growing with years, the great Rishis dwelling on that snowcapped sacred mountain were filled with wonder.  And the five Pandavas and the hundred sons of Dhritarashtra—­that propagator of the Kuru race—­grew up rapidly like a cluster of lotuses in a lake.’”

SECTION CXXV

(Sambhava Parva continued)

“Vaisampayana said, “Beholding his five handsome sons growing up before him in that great forest on the charming mountain slope, Pandu felt the last might of his arms revive once more.  One day in the season of spring which maddens every creature the king accompanied by his wife (Madri), began to rove in the woods where every tree had put forth new blossoms.  He beheld all around Palasas and Tilakas and Mangoes and Champakas and Parihadrakas and Karnikaras, Asokas and Kesaras and Atimuktas and Kuruvakas with swarms of maddened bees sweetly humming about.  And there were flowers of blossoming Parijatas with the Kokilas pouring forth their melodies from under every twig echoing with the sweet hums of the black bees.  And he beheld also various other kinds of trees bent down with the weight of their flowers and fruits.  And there were also many fine pools of water overgrown with hundreds of fragrant lotuses.  Beholding all these, Pandu felt the soft influence of desire.  Roving like a celestial with a light heart amidst such scenery, Pandu was alone with his wife Madri in semi-transparent attire.  And beholding the youthful Madri thus attired, the king’s desire flamed up like a forest-fire.  And ill-able to suppress his desire thus kindled at the sight of his wife of eyes like lotus-petals, he was completely overpowered.  The king then seized her against her will, but Madri trembling in fear resisted him to the best of her might.  Consumed by desire, he forgot everything about his misfortune.  And,

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