The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,884 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1.

“The person again, who, with passions under complete control, adopteth the vow of silence, refraining from action and entertaining no desire, achieveth success.  Why shouldst thou not, indeed, reverence the man who liveth on clean food, who refraineth from ever injuring others, whose heart is ever pure, who stands in the splendour of ascetic attributes, who is free from the leaden weight of desire, who abstaineth from injury even when sanctioned by religion?  Emaciated by austerities and reduced in flesh, marrow and blood, such a one conquereth not only this but the highest world.  And when the Muni sits in yoga meditation, becoming indifferent to happiness and misery, honour and insult, he then leaveth the world and enjoyeth communion with Brahma.  When the Muni taketh food like wine and other animals, i. e., without providing for it beforehand and without any relish (like a sleeping infant feeding on the mother’s lap), then like the all-pervading spirit he becometh identified with the whole universe and attaineth to salvation.’”

SECTION XCII

(Sambhava Parva continued)

“Ashtaka asked, ’Who amongst these, O king, both exerting constantly like the Sun and the Moon, first attaineth to communion with Brahma, the ascetic or the man of knowledge?’

“Yayati answered, ’The wise, with the help of the Vedas and of Knowledge, having ascertained the visible universe to be illusory, instantly realises the Supreme Spirit as the sole existent independent essence.  While they that devote themselves to Yoga meditation take time to acquire the same knowledge, for it is by practice alone that these latter divest themselves of the consciousness of quality.  Hence the wise attain to salvation first.  Then again if the person devoted to Yoga find not sufficient time in one life to attain success, being led astray by the attractions of the world, in his next life he is benefited by the progress already achieved, for he devoteth himself regretfully to the pursuit of success.  But the man of knowledge ever beholdeth the indestructible unity, and, is, therefore, though steeped in worldly enjoyments, never affected by them at heart.  Therefore, there is nothing to impede his salvation.  He, however, who faileth to attain to knowledge, should yet devote himself to piety as dependent on action (sacrifices &c.).  But he that devoteth himself to such piety, moved thereto by desire of salvation, can never achieve success.  His sacrifices bear no fruit and partake of the nature of cruelty.  Piety which is dependent on action that proceedeth not from the desire of fruit, is, in case of such men Yoga itself.’

“Ashtaka said, ’O king, thou lookest like a young man; thou art handsome and decked with a celestial garland.  Thy splendour is great!  Whence dost thou come and where dost thou go?  Whose messenger art thou?  Art thou going down into the Earth?’

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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