The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol. I. eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 76 pages of information about The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol. I..

If Sir William does not contrive to send me my passport, I will—­I will—­excommunicate him, and send him to the devil before his time.

Letter

FROM

THE HONOURABLE

CHARLES GREVILLE,

Nephew of Sir William Hamilton,

TO

LADY HAMILTON.

Letter OF THE HONOURABLE CHARLES GREVILLE, _&c_.

August 18th, 1794.

DEAR LADY HAMILTON,

You will, I am sure, be glad to hear, that a favourable change has been announced to me; and that I am reinstated in the King’s household, and honoured with a gold key, as his Vice-Chamberlain—­and I hope, in a few days, to be in parliament.

You have seen me in prosperity, and in adversity; and know how much I estimate worldly concerns, according to their influencing the opinion of my real friends.  Friendship has borne me up in the most difficult times; and the general satisfaction which my friends express, on my promotion, renders me very happy at present:  and, to make me more so, I have anticipated to my own mind the sincere satisfaction with which you will receive this news.

I should not flatter myself so far, if I was not very sincerely interested in your happiness; and, ever, affectionately your’s,

C.F.G.

Letters

FROM

LADY HAMILTON

TO

THE HON.  CHARLES GREVILLE,

Nephew of Sir William Hamilton.

Letters OF LADY HAMILTON, &c.

I.

  25th of February, [1800.]

DEAR SIR,

I received your letter by Mr. Campbell.  He is lodged with us.  We find him a pleasant man; and shall write fully by him.  He will tell you a little how we go on, as to our domestic happiness.  We are more united and comfortable than ever, in spite of the infamous Jacobin papers, jealous of Lord Nelson’s glory, and Sir William’s and mine.  But we do not mind them.  Lord N. is a truly virtuous and great man; and, because we have been fagging, and ruining our health, and sacrificing every comfort, in the cause of loyalty, our private characters are to be stabbed in the dark.  First, it was said, Sir W. and Lord N. fought; then, that we played, and lost.  First, Sir W. and Lord N. live like brothers; next, Lord N. never plays:  and this I give you my word of honour.  So I beg you will contradict any of these vile reports.  Not that Sir W. and Lord N. mind it; and I get scolded by the Queen, and all of them, for having suffered one day’s uneasiness.

Our fleet is off Malta:  Lord Nelson has taken Le Genereux, and was after the frigates; so the attempt to relieve Malta has failed.

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The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol. I. from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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