The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol. I. eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 76 pages of information about The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol. I..

Our excellent friend, General O’Hara, is very busy in erecting two rooms for the accommodation of your Ladyship and Sir William, when you visit this curious rock.  He is among the most hospitable and entertaining of men:  and we live together as all commanders of his Majesty’s land forces and fleets ought to do; and, I hope, will do, from the examples which have been shewn wherever I have acted with the army—­as Sir Charles Grey, the Governor of this garrison, and General Stuart, will testify; and, if the immortal Wolfe could be conjured from the grave, he would do so too.

I hope soon to hear, our dear Lord Nelson is quite well, under your fostering care; and, with my warmest wishes for every blessing to be showered down upon you and your’s, I have the honour to be, with the truest respect, esteem, and regard, your Ladyship’s very affectionate, humble servant,

  ST. VINCENT.

  Rosia House, Gibraltar,
    7th Dec. 1798.

IV.

MY DEAR LADY HAMILTON,

Permit me to introduce to your acquaintance and protection another hero of the Nile, in Captain Darby, of the Bellerophon; who you will find a pleasant, queer, and faithful Irishman.

I also beg leave to interest you in favour of Mrs. Lock; a daughter of the Duchess of Leinster, by Mr. Ogilvie.  Her husband is appointed Consul at Naples; which may occasion some difficulty in bringing her forward, unless the etiquette is altered touching Consuls.

God bless you, my dear Madam; and, be assured, I always am your Ladyship’s truly affectionate

  ST. VINCENT.

  Rosia House, Gibraltar,
    1st January 1799.

V.

MY DEAR LADY HAMILTON,

I cannot sufficiently thank you, for sending me her Sicilian Majesty’s most gracious letter; the contents of which I feel, as becomes a good royalist, and loyal subject:  and for your goodness to Mrs. Lock; who, poor thing! merits a more respectable situation than that of Consuless.  She is, certainly, a very comely woman, and truly amiable.

The designation Sir William has in contemplation for him, will place them in an honourable stile; and, I have no doubt, from the protection they have at home, will lead to ministerial character.

You are very good to my old friend Darby—­who is a good-humoured, blundering Irishman; and will make you laugh, in the midst of the pangs your Ladyship must suffer for the destiny of the delightful city and country to which you have so long contributed a large portion of the gaiety and charming society of Sir William’s hospitable mansion:  for, although I had not the good fortune to revisit Naples after Sir William’s return, all my travelling friends did ample justice to the liberality of the representatives of our Royal Master and Mistress.  Mr. Preston was charge, when I was at Naples with the Duke of Gloucester; and, though a worthy gentleman, and since a pious Bishop, he was certainly a dry comedian.

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The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol. I. from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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