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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 76 pages of information about The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol. I..

Sir William is writing for General Acton’s answer.

For God’s sake, consider it, and do!  We will go with you, if you will come and fetch us.

Sir William is ill; I am ill:  it will do us good.

God bless you!  Ever, ever, your’s sincerely,

  E. HAMILTON.

Letters

FROM THE

REV.  EDMUND NELSON

(Lord Nelson’s Father)

TO

LADY HAMILTON.

Letters OF THE REV.  EDMUND NELSON, _&c_.

I.

Madam,

I am much favoured by your polite letter, and the very friendly regard with which Sir William Hamilton and yourself always mention my dear son; who is, certainly, a worthy, good, brave man, parental partiality apart.  But, I myself am by no means satisfied with his present situation; as to its importance, its safety, or its merited rewards.  It [is] his to sow, but others reap the yellow harvests.  All things, I trust, however, will work together for good.

Captain Parker’s misfortune, I see, in every point of view, with a friendly concern.  Langford will quickly be upon his legs.

Though the amusements of a dirty sea-port are not the most refined, good health, and domestic cheerfulness, will be a happy substitute.

I beg the whole party to accept this my remembrance; and assurance of my regard, respect, and love:  and am, Madam, your most humble servant,

  EDM.  NELSON.

Burnham, August 11th, [1801.]

II.

Madam,

Your polite congratulation upon the entrance of a new year, I return seven-fold to you, and the whole of the party now under the hospitable roof of Merton Place.  Time is a sacred deposit committed to our trust; and, hereafter, we must account for the use we have made of it.  To me, a large portion of this treasure has already been granted, even seventy-nine years.  The complaint my dear son has felt is, I know, very, very painful:  and can be removed, only, with much care and caution; not venturing, without a thick covering, both head and feet, even to admire your parterres of snow-drops, which now appear in all their splendour.  The white robe which January wears, bespangled with ice, is handsome to look at; but we must not approach too near her.

I shall be very glad to know the Lord of Merton is recovered.

I am, Madam, your most humble servant,

  EDM.  NELSON.

Bath, January 7th, 1802.

Letters

From The

REV.  DR. NELSON,

         NOW

EARL NELSON,

TO

LADY HAMILTON.

Letters OF EARL NELSON, &c.

I.

  Hilborough, near Brandon,
  Wednesday, March 4th, 1801.

My Dear Lady,

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