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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 76 pages of information about The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol. I..

To return to the house—­The furniture must be bought with it; and the sooner it is done, the better I shall like it.

Oh! how bad the weather is!

The devils, here, wanted to plague my soul out, yesterday, just after dinner; but I would have seen them damned, before they should have come in.  The Countess Montmorris, Lady this, that, and t’other, came along-side, a Mr. Lubbock with them—­to desire they might come in.  I sent word, I was so busy that no persons could be admitted, as my time was employed in the King’s service.  Then they sent their names, which I cared not for:  and sent Captain Gore, to say it was impossible; and that, if they wanted to see a ship, they had better go to the Overyssel (a sixty-four in the Downs.) They said, no; they wanted to see me.  However, I was stout, and will not be shewn about like a beast! and away they went.

I believe, Captain Gore wishes me out of his ship; for the ladies admire him, I am told, very much:  but, however, no Captain could be kinder to me than he is.  These ladies, he told me afterwards, were his relations.

I have just got your letters; many thanks, for them!  You do not say, in the end, Sir William is arrived.

I am glad, that you approve.  You may rely, my dear friend, that I will not run any unnecessary risk!  No more boat work, I promise you; but, ever, your attached and faithful

  NELSON & BRONTE.

To the Duke, and Lord William, say every thing which is kind; and to Mrs. Nelson.

I am so dreadfully sea-sick, that I cannot hold up my head!

LETTER XVII.

  September 21st, [1801.]
  Quarter past Ten o’Clock.

MY DEAR EMMA,

I wish you would send the letter to Mrs. Dod’s, directly; for, otherwise, he may, inadvertently.

If done, and it comes to London, deliver some of the things.  The wardrobe is her’s; and if any of her clothes are at Mr. Dod’s, they had better be separated from mine—­and, indeed, what things are worth removing—­to have them directly sent to Merton.  A bed, or two, I believe, belong to my father; but, am not sure.

I send you Dr. Baird’s comfortable note, this moment received.

You will [find] Parker is treated like an infant.  Poor fellow!  I trust, he will get well, and take possession of his room at the farm.

Ever your affectionate,

  NELSON & BRONTE.

LETTER XVIII.

  Amazon, September 26, 1801. 
  Eight o’Clock.

MY DEAREST EMMA,

Your kind letters came on board about six o’clock.

You may rely upon one thing, that I shall like Merton; therefore, do not be uneasy on that account.  I have that opinion of your taste and judgment, that I do not believe it can fail in pleasing me.  We must only consider our means; and, for the rest, I am sure, you will soon make it the prettiest place in the world.

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