The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol II. eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 71 pages of information about The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol II..

MISS HORATIA NELSON,

(Lord Nelson’s Adopted Daughter;)

AND

MISS CHARLOTTE NELSON,

(Daughter of the present Earl.)

Letters

OF

LORD NELSON, &c.

TO

MISS HORATIA NELSON THOMSON.

  Victory, April 13th, 1804.

MY DEAR HORATIA,

I send you twelve books of Spanish dresses, which you will let your guardian angel, Lady Hamilton, keep for you, when you are tired of looking at them.  I am very glad to hear, that you are perfectly recovered; and, that you are a very good child.  I beg, my dear Horatia, that you will always continue so; which will be a great comfort to your most affectionate

  NELSON & BRONTE.

TO MISS CHARLOTTE NELSON.

  Victory, April 19th, 1804.

MY DEAR CHARLOTTE,

I thank you very much for your kind letters of January 3d, and 4th; and I feel truly sensible of your kind regard for that dear little orphan, Horatia.

Although her parents are lost; yet, she is not without a fortune:  and, I shall cherish her to the last moment of my life; and curse them who curse her, and Heaven bless them who bless her!  Dear innocent! she can have injured no one.

I am glad to hear, that she is attached to you; and, if she takes after her parents, so she will, to those who are kind to her.

I am, ever, dear Charlotte, your affectionate uncle,

  NELSON & BRONTE.

LETTERS

FROM

ALEXANDER DAVISON, ESQ.

TO

LADY HAMILTON.

LETTERS OF ALEX.  DAVISON, ESQ. &c.

I.

  [1804.]

MY DEAR MADAM,

I have, equally with yourself, felt extremely uneasy all night, thinking on the letter, which is a very serious one; and, until we receive our next dispatches, I shall still feel every day more and more anxious.

I rely on that kind Providence, which has hitherto sheltered him under every danger, upon the occasion.

He was on the eve of engaging, for protection—­and preservation—­It is, indeed, an anxious moment!

I have long thought, a plan was in agitation regarding the Toulon fleet being given up; but, whether it was in contemplation at the period the last letter was written, I know not.  I am rather disposed to think otherwise.

The next packet will explain the whole; and, I trust, will relieve our minds of that burden, hardly supportable at present.

I shall, this evening, go quietly into the country, and return to town about noon to-morrow:  as I require air, and a little relaxation; for I am, actually, overpowered with business.

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The Letters of Lord Nelson to Lady Hamilton, Vol II. from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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