Notes and Queries, Number 59, December 14, 1850 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 40 pages of information about Notes and Queries, Number 59, December 14, 1850.

RICHARD HOOPER.

Westminster Wedding.—­Jeremy Collier says, in one of his Essays (Part iii.  Essay viii.): 

    “As for the business of friendship you mentioned, ’tis not to be had at
    a Westminster Wedding.”

Being much interested in weddings in Westminster at the present day, I should be much obliged to any of your readers who can throw any light on the observation of the Essayist, as above cited.  What other authors use the term?

R.H.

Stone’s Diary.—­Stone, the celebrated sculptor, left a valuable diary.  The MS. was in the possession of Vertue the engraver.  Has it ever been printed?

EDWARD F. RIMBAULT.

Dr. King’s Poem of The Toast.—­Where can I find a key to Dr. King’s Heroic Poem, called The Toast? Isaac Reed’s copy, with a manuscript key, sold at his sale for 10l. 10s.

EDWARD F. RIMBAULT.

Anima Magis, &c.—­To whom is this sentence to be ascribed—­

  “Anima magis est ubi amat
  Quam ubi animat.”

TYRO-ETYMOLOGICUS.

The Adventures of Peter Wilkins.—­Is the author of this delightful work of fiction known?  The first edition was published in 1751, but it does not contain the dedication to Elizabeth, Countess of Northumberland, found in later impressions.  When was this dedication added?  It is observable that in all the editions I have seen, the initials R.P. are signed to the dedication, while R.S. appears on the title-page.

EDWARD F. RIMBAULT.

Talmud, Translations of.—­1.  Have there been any English translations of the Talmud, or any complete section of it? 2.  What are the most esteemed Continental and Latin translations?

S.P.H.T.

Torn by Horses.—­What is the last instance in the history of France of a culprit being torn by horses?  Jean Chatel, who attempted to assassinate Henri Quatre, suffered thus in 1595. (Crowe’s France, i. 364.)

ED. S. JACKSON.

The Marks *, [obelus], [diesis], _&c._—­What is the origin of the asterisk, obelus, &c., used for references to notes?  When were they first used?  What are their proper names?

ED. S. JACKSON.

Totteridge, Herts, Oct. 23.

Blackguard.—­Walking once through South Wales, we found an old woman by the roadside selling a drink she called blackguard.  It was composed of beer and gin, spiced with pepper, and well deserved its name.  Is this a common beverage in the principality?

J.W.H.

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REPLIES.

CHURCH HISTORY SOCIETY.

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Notes and Queries, Number 59, December 14, 1850 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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