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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 243 pages of information about The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, Or Gustavus Vassa, The African.
into the barge from the ship, to the astonishment and sorrow of all on board.  The tide, rather unluckily for me, had just turned downward, so that we quickly fell down the river along with it, till we came among some outward-bound West Indiamen; for he was resolved to put me on board the first vessel he could get to receive me.  The boat’s crew, who pulled against their will, became quite faint different times, and would have gone ashore; but he would not let them.  Some of them strove then to cheer me, and told me he could not sell me, and that they would stand by me, which revived me a little; and I still entertained hopes; for as they pulled along he asked some vessels to receive me, but they could not.  But, just as we had got a little below Gravesend, we came alongside of a ship which was going away the next tide for the West Indies; her name was the Charming Sally, Captain James Doran; and my master went on board and agreed with him for me; and in a little time I was sent for into the cabin.  When I came there Captain Doran asked me if I knew him; I answered that I did not; ‘Then,’ said he ‘you are now my slave.’  I told him my master could not sell me to him, nor to any one else.  ‘Why,’ said he,’did not your master buy you?’ I confessed he did.  ‘But I have served him,’ said I,’many years, and he has taken all my wages and prize-money, for I only got one sixpence during the war; besides this I have been baptized; and by the laws of the land no man has a right to sell me:’  And I added, that I had heard a lawyer and others at different times tell my master so.  They both then said that those people who told me so were not my friends; but I replied—­it was very extraordinary that other people did not know the law as well as they.  Upon this Captain Doran said I talked too much English; and if I did not behave myself well, and be quiet, he had a method on board to make me.  I was too well convinced of his power over me to doubt what he said; and my former sufferings in the slave-ship presenting themselves to my mind, the recollection of them made me shudder.  However, before I retired I told them that as I could not get any right among men here I hoped I should hereafter in Heaven; and I immediately left the cabin, filled with resentment and sorrow.  The only coat I had with me my master took away with him, and said if my prize-money had been 10,000 L. he had a right to it all, and would have taken it.  I had about nine guineas, which, during my long sea-faring life, I had scraped together from trifling perquisites and little ventures; and I hid it that instant, lest my master should take that from me likewise, still hoping that by some means or other I should make my escape to the shore; and indeed some of my old shipmates told me not to despair, for they would get me back again; and that, as soon as they could get their pay, they would immediately come to Portsmouth to me, where this ship was going:  but, alas! all my hopes were baffled, and the hour of my deliverance was yet far off.  My master, having soon concluded his bargain with the captain, came out of the cabin, and he and his people got into the boat and put off; I followed them with aching eyes as long as I could, and when they were out of sight I threw myself on the deck, while my heart was ready to burst with sorrow and anguish.

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