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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 159 pages of information about Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, an American Slave, Written by Himself.

4.  W. Porter, Jailor, states that Bibb was in the work-house at Louisville, held and sold afterwards to the persons and at the places named in this volume.

5.  W.H.  Gatewood, with much Southern dignity, will answer no questions, but shows his relation to these matters by naming “King”—­saying, “W.H.  Bibb is acquainted with him,” and promising “a full history of the case.”

6.  Daniel S. Lane, with remarkable straight-forwardness and stupidity, tells all he knows, and then wants to know what they ask him for.  The writer will answer that question.  He wanted to prove by two or more witnesses, the truth of his own statements; which has most surely been accomplished.

Having thus presented an array of testimony sustaining the facts alleged in this narrative, the introduction will be concluded by introducing a letter signed by respectable men of Detroit, and endorsed by Judge Wilkins, showing the high esteem in which Mr. Bibb is held by those who know him well where he makes his home.  Their testimony expresses their present regard as well as an opinion of his past character.  It is introduced here with the greatest satisfaction, as the writer is assured, from an intimate acquaintance with Henry Bibb, that all who know him hereafter will entertain the same sentiments toward him: 

* * * * *

Detroit, March 10, 1845.

The undersigned have pleasure in recommending Henry Bibb to the kindness and confidence of Anti-slavery friends in every State.  He has resided among us for some years.  His deportment, his conduct, and his Christian course have won our esteem and affection.  The narrative of his sufferings and more early life has been thoroughly investigated by a Committee appointed for the purpose.  They sought evidence respecting it in every proper quarter, and their report attested its undoubted truth.  In this conclusion we all cordially unite.
H. Bibb has for some years publicly made this narrative to assemblies, whose number cannot be told; it has commanded public attention in this State, and provoked inquiry.  Occasionally too we see persons from the South, who knew him in early years, yet not a word or fact worthy of impairing its truth has reached us; but on the contrary, every thing tended to its corroboration.
Mr. Bibb’s Anti-slavery efforts in this State have produced incalculable benefit.  The Lord has blessed him into an instrument of great power.  He has labored much, and for very inadequate compensation.  Lucrative offers for other quarters did not tempt him to a more profitable field.  His sincerity and disinterestedness are therefore beyond suspicion.

We bid him “God-speed,” on his route.  We bespeak for him
every kind consideration. * * * *

H. Hallock,
President of the Detroit Lib.  Association. 
Cullen Brown, VICE-PRESIDENT
S.M.  Holmes, SECRETARY
J.D.  BALDWIN,
CHARLES H. STEWART,
MARTIN WILSON,
WILLIAM BARNUM.

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