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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 159 pages of information about Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, an American Slave, Written by Himself.

Moreover, the writer of this introduction is well acquainted with his handwriting and style.  The entire manuscript I have examined and prepared for the press.  Many of the closing pages of it were written by Mr. Bibb in my office.  And the whole is preserved for inspection now.  An examination of it will show that no alteration of sentiment, language or style, was necessary to make it what it now is, in the hands of the reader.  The work of preparation for the press was that of orthography and punctuation merely, an arrangement of the chapters, and a table of contents—­little more than falls to the lot of publishers generally.

The fidelity of the narrative is sustained by the most satisfactory and ample testimony.  Time has proved its claims to truth.  Thorough investigation has sifted and analysed every essential fact alleged, and demonstrated clearly that this thrilling and eloquent narrative, though stranger than fiction, is undoubtedly true.

It is only necessary to present the following documents to the reader, to sustain this declaration.  For convenience of reference, and that they may be more easily understood, the letters will be inserted consecutively, with explanations following the last.

The best preface to these letters, is the report of a committee appointed to investigate the truth of Mr. Bibb’s narrative as he has delivered it in public for years past.

Report

     Of the undersigned, committee appointed by the Detroit
     liberty association to investigate the truth of the
     narrative of Henry Bibb, A fugitive from slavery, and report
     thereon

Mr. Bibb has addressed several assemblies in Michigan, and his narrative is generally known.  Some of his hearers, among whom were Liberty men, felt doubt as to the truth of his statements.  Respect for their scruples and the obligation of duty to the public induced the formation of the present Committee.
The Committee entered on the duty confided to them, resolved on a searching scrutiny, and an unreserved publication of its result.  Mr. Bibb acquiesced in the inquiry with a praiseworthy spirit.  He attended before the Committee and gave willing aid to its object.  He was subjected to a rigorous examination.  Facts—­dates—­persons—­and localities were demanded and cheerfully furnished.  Proper inquiry—­either by letter, or personally, or through the medium of friends was then made from every person, and in every quarter likely to elucidate the truth.  In fact no test for its ascertainment, known to the sense or experience of the Committee, was omitted.  The result was the collection of a large body of testimony from very diversified quarters.  Slave owners, slave dealers, fugitives from slavery,
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