American Eloquence, Volume 2 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 202 pages of information about American Eloquence, Volume 2.

Experience has confirmed these views.  The Abolitionists who have acted on them have a “short method” with all unbelievers.  They have but to point to their own success, in contrast with every other man’s failure.  To waken the nation to its real state, and chain it to the consideration of this one duty, is half the work.  So much we have done.  Slavery has been made the question of this generation.  To startle the South to madness, so that every step she takes, in her blindness, is one step more toward ruin, is much.  This we have done.  Witness Texas and the Fugitive Slave Law.

To have elaborated for the nation the only plan of redemption, pointed out the only exodus from this “sea of troubles,” is much.  This we claim to have done in our motto of IMMEDIATE, UNCONDITIONAL, EMANCIPATION ON THE SOIL.  The closer any statesmanlike mind looks into the question, the more favor our plan finds with it.  The Christian asks fairly of the infidel, “If this religion be not from God, how do you explain its triumph, and the history of the first three centuries?” Our question is similar.  If our agitation has not been wisely planned and conducted, explain for us the history of the last twenty years!  Experience is a safe light to walk by, and he is not a rash man who expects success in future from the same means which have secured it in times past.

CHARLES SUMNER,

OF MASSACHUSETTS. (BORN 1811, DIED 1874.)

ON THE REPEAL OF THE FUGITIVE SLAVE LAW—­

IN THE UNITED STATES SENATE, AUGUST 26, 1852.

THURSDAY, 26TH AUGUST, 1852.—­The Civil and Diplomatic Appropriation Bill being under consideration, the following amendment was moved by Mr. Hunter, of Virginia, on the recommendation of the Committee on Finance: 

“That, where the ministerial officers of the United States have or shall incur extraordinary expense in executing the laws thereof, the payment of which is not specifically provided for, the President of the United States is authorized to allow the payment thereof, under the special taxation of the District or Circuit Court of the District in which the said services have been or shall be rendered, to be paid from the appropriation for defraying the expenses of the Judiciary.”

Mr. Sumner seized the opportunity for which he had been waiting, and at once moved the following amendment to the amendment: 

“Provided, That no such allowance shall be authorized for any expenses incurred in executing the Act of September 18, 1850, for the surrender of fugitives from service or labor; which said Act is hereby repealed.”

On this he took the floor, and spoke as follows: 

MR. PRESIDENT,

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American Eloquence, Volume 2 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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