American Eloquence, Volume 1 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 194 pages of information about American Eloquence, Volume 1.
ensign of the Republic, now known and honored through-out the earth, still full high advanced, its arms and trophies streaming in their original lustre, not a stripe erased or polluted, not a single star obscured, bearing for its motto, no such miserable interrogotary as “What is all this worth?” nor those other words of delusion and folly, “Liberty first and Union afterward”; but everywhere, spread all over in characters of living light, blazing on all its ample folds, as they float over the sea and over the land, and in every wind under the whole heavens, that other sentiment, dear to every true American heart,—­Liberty and Union, now and forever, one and inseparable!

JOHN C. CALHOUN

—­Of south Carolina. (Born 1782, died 1850.)

ON NULLIFICATION AND THE FORCE BILL,

In the united states Senate, Feb. 15, 1833.

MR. PRESIDENT: 

At the last session of Congress, it was avowed on all sides that the public debt, as to all practical purposes, was in fact paid, the small surplus remaining being nearly covered by the money in the Treasury and the bonds for duties which had already accrued; but with the arrival of this event our last hope was doomed to be disappointed.  After a long session of many months, and the most earnest effort on the part of South Carolina and the other Southern States to obtain relief, all that could be effected was a small reduction in the amount of the duties, but a reduction of such a character that, while it diminished the amount of burden, it distributed that burden more unequally than even the obnoxious act of 1828; reversing the principle adopted by the bill of 1816, of laying higher duties on the unprotected than the protected articles, by repealing almost entirely the duties laid upon the former, and imposing the burden almost entirely on the latter.  It was thus that, instead of relief—­instead of an equal distribution of burdens and benefits of the government, on the payment of the debt, as had been fondly anticipated,—­the duties were so arranged as to be, in fact, bounties on one side and taxation on the other; thus placing the two great sections of the country in direct conflict in reference to its fiscal action, and thereby letting in that flood of political corruption which threatens to sweep away our Constitution and our liberty.

This unequal and unjust arrangement was pronounced, both by the administration, through its proper organ, the Secretary of the Treasury, and by the opposition, to be a permanent adjustment; and it was thus that all hope of relief through the action of the General Government terminated; and the crisis so long apprehended at length arrived, at which the State was compelled to choose between absolute acquiescence in a ruinous system of oppression, or a resort to her reserved powers—­powers of which she alone was the rightful judge, and which only, in this momentous juncture, could save her.  She determined on the latter.

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American Eloquence, Volume 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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