Bab Ballads and Savoy Songs eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 69 pages of information about Bab Ballads and Savoy Songs.

  O, my darling, O, my pet,
  Whatever else you may forget,
  In yonder isle beyond the sea,
  O, don’t forget you’ve married me!

    You’ll lay your head
    Upon your bed
      At set of sun. 
    You will not sing
    Of anything
      To any one: 
    You’ll sit and mope
    All day, I hope,
      And shed a tear
    Upon the life
    Your little wife
      Is passing here! 
    And if so be
    You think of me,
      Please tell the moon: 
    I’ll read it all
    In rays that fall
      On the lagoon: 
    You’ll be so kind
    As tell the wind
      How you may be,
    And send me words
    By little birds
      To comfort me!

  And O, my darling, O, my pet,
  Whatever else you may forget,
  In yonder isle beyond the sea,
  O, don’t forget you’ve married me!

THE DARNED MOUNSEER.

  I shipped, d’ye see, in a Revenue sloop,
    And, off Cape Finistere,
      A merchantman we see,
      A Frenchman, going free,
    So we made for the bold Mounseer. 
        D’ye see? 
    We made for the bold Mounseer! 
  But she proved to be a Frigate—­and she up with her ports,
    And fires with a thirty-two! 
      It come uncommon near,
      But we answered with a cheer,
    Which paralyzed the Parley-voo,
        D’ye see? 
    Which paralyzed the Parley-voo!

  Then our Captain he up and he says, says he,
    “That chap we need not fear,—­
      We can take her, if we like,
      She is sartin for to strike,
    For she’s only a darned Mounseer,
        D’ye see? 
    She’s only a darned Mounseer! 
  But to fight a French fal-lal—­it’s like hittin’ of a gal—­
    It’s a lubberly thing for to do;
      For we, with all our faults,
      Why, we’re sturdy British salts,
    While she’s but a Parley-voo,
        D’ye see? 
    A miserable Parley-voo!”

  So we up with our helm, and we scuds before the breeze,
    As we gives a compassionating cheer;
      Froggee answers with a shout
      As he sees us go about,
    Which was grateful of the poor Mounseer,
        D’ye see? 
    Which was grateful of the poor Mounseer! 
  And I’ll wager in their joy they kissed each other’s cheek
    (Which is what them, furriners do),
      And they blessed their lucky stars? 
      We were hardy British tars
    Who had pity on a poor Parley-voo,
        D’ye see? 
    Who had pity on a poor Parley-voo!

THE HUMANE MIKADO.

  A more humane Mikado never
    Did in Japan exist,
      To nobody second,
      I’m certainly reckoned
    A true philanthropist,
  It is my very humane endeavor
    To make, to some extent,
      Each evil liver

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Bab Ballads and Savoy Songs from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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