The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking eBook

Helen Stuart Campbell
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 239 pages of information about The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking.
we have a work that is not to be judged by ordinary standards.  The story holds the reader’s interest by its realistic pictures of the local life around us, by its constant and progressive action, and by the striking dramatic quality of scenes and incidents, described in a style clear, connected, and harmonious.  The novel-reader who is not taken up and made to share the author’s enthusiasm before getting half-way through the book must possess a taste satiated and depraved by indulgence in exciting and sensational fiction.  The earnestness of the author’s presentation of essentially great purposes lends intensity to her narrative.  Succeeding as she does in impressing us strongly with her convictions, there is nothing of dogmatism in their preaching.  But the suggestiveness of every chapter is backed by pictures of real life.”—­New York World.

Sold by all booksellers.  Mailed, post-paid, on receipt of price, by the publishers,

LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY, BOSTON.

PRISONERS OF POVERTY.

WOMEN WAGE-WORKERS:  THEIR TRADES AND THEIR LIVES.

BY HELEN CAMPBELL,

AUTHOR OF “THE WHAT-TO-DO CLUB,” “MRS. HERNDON’S INCOME,” “MISS MELINDA’S
OPPORTUNITY,” ETC.

16mo.  Cloth. $1.00.  Paper, 50 cents.

The author writes earnestly and warmly, but without prejudice, and her volume is an eloquent plea for the amelioration of the evils with which she deals.  In the present importance into which the labor question generally has loomed, this volume is a timely and valuable contribution to its literature, and merits wide reading and careful thought.—­Saturday Evening Gazette.
She has given us a most effective picture of the condition of New York working-women, because she has brought to the study of the subject not only great care but uncommon aptitude.  She has made a close personal investigation, extending apparently over a long time; she has had the penetration to search many queer and dark corners which are not often thought of by similar explorers; and we suspect that, unlike too many philanthropists, she has the faculty of winning confidence and extracting the truth.  She is sympathetic, but not a sentimentalist; she appreciates exactness in facts and figures; she can see both sides of a question, and she has abundant common sense.—­New York Tribune.
Helen Campbell’s “Prisoners of Poverty” is a striking example of the trite phrase that “truth is stranger than fiction.”  It is a series of pictures of the lives of women wage-workers in New York, based on the minutest personal inquiry and observation.  No work of fiction has ever presented more startling pictures, and, indeed, if they occurred in a novel would at once be stamped as a figment of the brain....  Altogether, Mrs. Campbell’s book is a notable contribution to the labor literature of the day, and will undoubtedly
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The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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