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Helen Stuart Campbell
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 239 pages of information about The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking.

TO PURIFY SINKS AND DRAINS.

To one pound of common copperas add one gallon of boiling water, and use when dissolved.  The copperas is poison, and must never be left unmarked.

FURNITURE POLISH.

Mix two tablespoonfuls of sweet or linseed oil with a tablespoonful of turpentine, and rub on with a piece of flannel, polishing with a dry piece.

TO KEEP EGGS.

Be sure that the eggs are fresh.  Place them points down in a stone jar or tight firkin, and pour over them the following brine, which is enough for a hundred and fifty:—­

One pint of slacked lime, one pint of salt, two ounces of cream of tartar, and four gallons of water.  Boil all together for ten minutes; skim, and, when cold, pour it over the eggs.  They can also be kept in salt tightly packed, but not as well.

TO MAKE HARD WATER SOFT.

Dissolve in one gallon of boiling water a pound and a quarter of washing soda, and a quarter of a pound of borax.  In washing clothes allow quarter of a cup of this to every gallon of water.

TO TAKE OUT FRUIT-STAINS.

Stretch the stained part tightly over a bowl, and pour on boiling water till it is free from spot.

TO TAKE OUT INK-SPOTS.

Ink spilled upon carpets or on woolen table-covers can be taken out, if washed at once in cold water.  Change the water often, and continue till the stain is gone.

MIXED SPICES.

Three heaping tablespoonfuls of ground cinnamon, one heaping one each of clove and mace, and one even one of allspice.  Mix thoroughly, and use for dark cakes and for puddings.

SPICE SALT.

Four ounces of salt; one of black pepper; one each of thyme, sweet marjoram, and summer savory; half an ounce each of clove, allspice, and mace; quarter of an ounce of cayenne pepper; one ounce of celery salt.  Mix all together; sift three times, and keep closely covered.  Half an ounce will flavor a stuffing for roast meat; and a tablespoonful is nice in many soups and stews.

TO WASH GREASY TIN AND IRON.

Pour a few drops of ammonia into every greasy roasting-pan, first half-filling with warm water.  A bottle of ammonia should always stand near the sink for such uses.  Never allow dirty pots or pans to stand and dry; for it doubles the labor of washing.  Pour in water, and use ammonia, and the work is half done.

TO CLEAN BRASS AND COPPER.

Scrape a little rotten-stone fine, and make into a paste with sweet oil.  Rub on with a piece of flannel; let it dry, and polish with a chamois-skin.  Copper is cleaned either with vinegar and salt mixed in equal parts, or with oxalic acid.  The latter is a deadly poison, and must be treated accordingly.

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