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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 319 pages of information about The Government Class Book.

Chapter LV.

     Contracts of Sale

Chapter LVI.

     Fraudulent Sales; Assignments; Gifts, &c.

Chapter LVII.

     Bailment

Chapter LVIII.

     Principal and Agent, or Factor; Broker; Lien, &c.

Chapter LIX.

     Partnership

Chapter LX.

     Promissory Notes

Chapter LXI.

     Bills of Exchange; Interest; Usury

Chapter LXII.

     Crimes and Misdemeanors

Law of Nations.

Chapter LXIII.

     Origin and Progress of the Law of Nations; the Natural, Customary,
     and Conventional Laws of Nations

Chapter LXIV.

     The Jurisdiction of Nations; their mutual Rights and Obligations;
     the Rights of Embassadors, Ministers, &c.

Chapter LXV.

     Offensive and Defensive War; just Causes of War; Reprisals;
     Alliances in War

Chapter LXVI.

     Declaration of War; its Effect upon the Person and Property of the
     Enemy’s Subjects; Stratagems in War; Privateering

Chapter LXVII.

     Rights and Duties of Neutral Nations; Contraband Goods; Blockade;
     Right of Search; Safe Conducts and Passports; Truces; Treaties of
     Peace

Synopsis of the State Constitutions.

Maine
New Hampshire
Vermont
Massachusetts
Rhode Island
Connecticut
New York
New Jersey
Pennsylvania
Delaware
Maryland
Virginia
North Carolina
South Carolina
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
Mississippi
Louisiana
Texas
Arkansas
Missouri
Tennessee
Kentucky
Ohio
Indiana
Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Iowa
California
Minnesota

Constitution of the United States

Government Class Book.

Principles of Government.

Chapter I.

Mankind fitted for Society, and for Civil Government and Laws.

Sec.1.  Mankind are social beings.  They are by nature fitted for society.  By this we mean that they are naturally disposed to associate with each other.  Indeed, such is their nature, that they could not be happy without such association.  Hence we conclude that the Creator has designed men for society.  It can not, therefore, be true, as some say, that the savage state is the natural state of man.

Sec.2.  Man is so formed that he is dependent upon his fellow men.  He has not the natural strength of other animals.  He needs the assistance of creatures like himself to protect and preserve his own being.  We can hardly imagine how a person could procure the necessaries of life without such assistance.  But men have the gifts of reason and speech.  By conversation they are enabled to improve their reason and increase their knowledge, and to find methods of supplying their wants, and of improving their social condition.

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