The Man with the Clubfoot eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 201 pages of information about The Man with the Clubfoot.

The Man with the Clubfoot

CHAPTER I

I SEEK A BED IN ROTTERDAM

The reception clerk looked up from the hotel register and shook his head firmly.  “Very sorry, saire,” he said, “not a bed in ze house.”  And he closed the book with a snap.

Outside the rain came down heavens hard.  Every one who came into the brightly lit hotel vestibule entered with a gush of water.  I felt I would rather die than face the wind-swept streets of Rotterdam again.

I turned once more to the clerk who was now busy at the key-rack.

“Haven’t you really a corner?  I wouldn’t mind where it was, as it is only for the night.  Come now...”

“Very sorry, saire.  We have two gentlemen sleeping in ze bathrooms already.  If you had reserved...”  And he shrugged his shoulders and bent towards a visitor who was demanding his key.

I turned away with rage in my heart.  What a cursed fool I had been not to wire from Groningen!  I had fully intended to, but the extraordinary conversation I had had with Dicky Allerton had put everything else out of my head.  At every hotel I had tried it had been the same story—­Cooman’s, the Maas, the Grand, all were full even to the bathrooms.  If I had only wired....

As I passed out into the porch I bethought myself of the porter.  A hotel porter had helped me out of a similar plight in Breslau once years ago.  This porter, with his red, drink-sodden face and tarnished gold braid, did not promise well, so far as a recommendation for a lodging for the night was concerned.  Still...

I suppose it was my mind dwelling on my experience at Breslau that made me address the man in German.  When one has been familiar with a foreign tongue from one’s boyhood, it requires but a very slight mental impulse to drop into it.  From such slight beginnings do great enterprises spring.  If I had known the immense ramification of adventure that was to spread its roots from that simple question, I verily believe my heart would have failed me and I would have run forth into the night and the rain and roamed the streets till morning.

Well, I found myself asking the man in German if he knew where I could get a room for the night.

He shot a quick glance at me from under his reddened eyelids.

“The gentleman would doubtless like a German house?” he queried.

You may hardly credit it, but my interview with Dicky Allerton that afternoon had simply driven the war out of my mind.  When one has lived much among foreign peoples, one’s mentality slips automatically into their skin.  I was now thinking in German—­at least so it seems to me when I look back upon that night—­and I answered without reflecting.

“I don’t care where it is as long as I can get somewhere to sleep out of this infernal rain!”

“The gentleman can have a good, clean bed at the Hotel Sixt in the little street they call the Vos in’t Tuintje, on the canal behind the Bourse.  The proprietress is a good German, jawohl ...  Frau Anna Schratt her name is.  The gentleman need only say he comes from Franz at the Bopparder Hof.”

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The Man with the Clubfoot from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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