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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 94 pages of information about Sword and crozier, drama in five acts.

Jorun.—­No weapons, Kalf!  You will not go to Flugumyr, this time; rather too long you have been there as a child. (Towards BRAND KOLBEINSSON.) My husband, remember my words.  To kill one of my kinsman Kolbein’s or Lady Helga’s men is to conjure up odds against you, whatever be the provocation. (Exit with the boys.)

Broddi.—­Never shall that come to pass that a man of low birth govern so large a dominion. (Exeunt all.)

SCENE II

(Room at Flugumyr.  LADY HELGA and the woman physician SALVOR enter.)

Helga.—­I have much to do about the house and can attend the patient but little.  How is my husband, Salvor?

Salvor.—­Rather poorly!  He is now confessing to Bishop Botolf, Lady Helga.

Helga.—­Confessing?  Did he speak about the disposition of his dominions after his death?

Salvor.—­The bishop touched upon that, but Kolbein said that this would have to wait until his kinsmen were assembled.

Helga.—­To what purpose is the advice of his kinsmen in that matter?  I see how it will end.

Salvor.—­I have hopes that your husband will again recover his health this time.

Helga.—­And how long will he keep it then?

Salvor.—­So long as he stirs not.

Helga.—­My husband will have to go to war and do battle as long as he lives.

Salvor.—­Now he longs for peace.

Helga.—­Then is he surely sick! (Vehemently.) My husband must not be sick; he will have to speak with his kinsmen, when they come.  Give him strong drugs that he may have strength to do so.  His sickness must not become known in the Westfirths by Thord Kakali.

Salvor.—­Such strong drugs are not without danger.

Helga.—­What danger is there in them?

Salvor.—­That he loses possession of his senses, and becomes even more sick thereafter.

Helga (vehemently).—­His kinsmen must not know that he is sick, or else they will take matters in their own hands.  He will have to have drugs so strong as to give him strength to hold council with them.

Salvor.—­But if he loses possession of his senses during it?

Helga (with a look of relief).—­Let me take care of that.  Then I shall speak for him, for all his intentions are known to me.

Salvor.—­My advice it is not to use strong drugs; they may endanger Kolbein’s life.

Helga.—­Will you, low-born woman, give advice to a great?

Salvor.—­Why seek you then a low-born woman to heal the great?

Helga.—­I knew none better.  Do as I bid you!

Salvor.—­I shall do as you bid, my lady.  You run the risk, not I.

(Enter THOROLF.)

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