Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 225 pages of information about Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I.
the one in his Ilias, the other in his Odysseis:  then Virgil, whose like intention was to doe in the person of Aeneas:  after him Ariosto comprised them both in his Orlando:  and lately Tasso dissevered them againe, and formed both parts in two persons, namely, that part which they in philosophy call Ethice, or vertues of a private man, coloured in his Rinaldo:  the other named Politice, in his Godfredo.  By ensample of which excellent Poets, I laboure to pourtraict in Arthure, before he was king, the image of a brave knight, perfected in the twelve private morall vertues, as Aristotle hath devised:  which if I find to be well accepted, I may be perhaps encoraged to frame the other part of pollitike vertues in his person, after he came to bee king.

To some I know this Methode will seem displeasant, which had rather have good discipline delivered plainly in way of precepts, or sermoned at large, as they use, then thus clowdily enwrapped in Allegoricall devises.  But such, mee seeme, should be satisfied with the use of these dayes, seeing all things accounted by their showes, and nothing esteemed of, that is not delightfull and pleasing to common sense.  For this cause is Xenophon preferred before Plato, for that the one, in the exquisite depth of his judgement, formed a Commune-wealth, such as it should be; but the other, in the person of Cyrus and the Persians, fashioned a government, such as might best be:  So much more profitable and gracious is doctrine by ensample then by rule.  So have I laboured to do in the person of Arthure:  whom I conceive, after his long education by Timon (to whom he was by Merlin delivered to be brought up, so soone as he was borne of the Lady Igrayne) to have seen in a dreame or vision the Faerie Queene, with whose excellent beautie ravished, hee awaking, resolved to seek her out:  and so, being by Merlin armed, and by Timon throughly instructed, he went to seeke her forth in Faery land.  In that Faery Queene I mean Glory in my generall intention:  but in my particular I conceive the most excellent and glorious person of our soveraine the Queene, and her kingdome in Faery land.  And yet, in some places else, I doe otherwise shadow her.  For considering shee beareth two persons, the one of a most royall Queene or Empresse, the other of a most vertuous and beautifull lady, this latter part in some places I doe expresse in Belphoebe, fashioning her name according to your owne excellent conceipt of Cynthia,[2] (Phoebe and Cynthia being both names of Diana).  So in the person of Prince Arthure I sette forth magnificence in particular, which vertue, for that (according to Aristotle and the rest) it is the perfection of all the rest, and containeth in it them all, therefore in the whole course I mention the deeds of Arthure appliable to the vertue, which I write of in that booke.  But of the twelve other vertues I make XII other knights the patrons, for the more varietie of the historic: 

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.