The Quest of the Silver Fleece eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 317 pages of information about The Quest of the Silver Fleece.

The boy was listening in incredulous curiosity, half minded to laugh, half minded to edge away from the black-red radiance of yonder dusky swamp.  He glanced furtively backward, and his heart gave a great bound.

“Some is little and broad and black, and they yells—­” chanted the girl.  And as she chanted, deep, harsh tones came booming through the forest: 

Zo-ra!  Zo-ra! O—­o—­oh, Zora!”

He saw far behind him, toward the shadows of the swamp, an old woman—­short, broad, black and wrinkled, with fangs and pendulous lips and red, wicked eyes.  His heart bounded in sudden fear; he wheeled toward the girl, and caught only the uncertain flash of her garments—­the wood was silent, and he was alone.

He arose, startled, quickly gathered his bundle, and looked around him.  The sun was strong and high, the morning fresh and vigorous.  Stamping one foot angrily, he strode jauntily out of the wood toward the big road.

But ever and anon he glanced curiously back.  Had he seen a haunt?  Or was the elf-girl real?  And then he thought of her words: 

“We’se known us all our lives.”

Two

THE SCHOOL

Day was breaking above the white buildings of the Negro school and throwing long, low lines of gold in at Miss Sarah Smith’s front window.  She lay in the stupor of her last morning nap, after a night of harrowing worry.  Then, even as she partially awoke, she lay still with closed eyes, feeling the shadow of some great burden, yet daring not to rouse herself and recall its exact form; slowly again she drifted toward unconsciousness.

Bang! bang! bang!” hard knuckles were beating upon the door below.

She heard drowsily, and dreamed that it was the nailing up of all her doors; but she did not care much, and but feebly warded the blows away, for she was very tired.

Bang! bang! bang!” persisted the hard knuckles.

She started up, and her eye fell upon a letter lying on her bureau.  Back she sank with a sigh, and lay staring at the ceiling—­a gaunt, flat, sad-eyed creature, with wisps of gray hair half-covering her baldness, and a face furrowed with care and gathering years.

It was thirty years ago this day, she recalled, since she first came to this broad land of shade and shine in Alabama to teach black folks.

It had been a hard beginning with suspicion and squalor around; with poverty within and without the first white walls of the new school home.  Yet somehow the struggle then with all its helplessness and disappointment had not seemed so bitter as today:  then failure meant but little, now it seemed to mean everything; then it meant disappointment to a score of ragged urchins, now it meant two hundred boys and girls, the spirits of a thousand gone before and the hopes of thousands to come.  In her imagination the significance of these half dozen gleaming buildings perched aloft seemed portentous—­big with the destiny not simply of a county and a State, but of a race—­a nation—­a world.  It was God’s own cause, and yet—­

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Quest of the Silver Fleece from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook