The Underground Railroad eBook

William Still
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,197 pages of information about The Underground Railroad.

    CAMDEN, DEL., March 23d, 1857.

DEAR SIR;—­I tak my pen in hand to write to you, to inform you what we have had to go throw for the last two weaks.  Thir wir six men and two woman was betraid on the tenth of this month, thea had them in prison but thea got out was conveyed by a black man, he told them he wood bring them to my hows, as he wos told, he had ben ther Befor, he has com with Harrett, a woman that stops at my hous when she pases tow and throw yau.  You don’t no me I supos, the Rev. Thomas H. Kennard dos, or Peter Lowis.  He Road Camden Circuit, this man led them in dover prisin and left them with a whit man; but tha tour out the winders and jump out, so cum back to camden.  We put them throug, we hav to carry them 19 mils and cum back the sam night wich maks 38 mils.  It is tou much for our littel horses.  We must do the bes we can, ther is much Bisness dun on this Road.  We hay to go throw dover and smerny, the two wors places this sid of mary land lin.  If you have herd or sean them ples let me no.  I will Com to Phila be for long and then I will call and se you.  There is much to do her.  Ples to wright, I Remain your frend,

    WILLIAM BRINKLY.

    Remember me to Thom.  Kennard.

The balance of these brave fugitives, although not named in this connection, succeeded in getting off safely.  But how the betrayer, sheriff and hunters got out of their dilemma, the Committee was never fully posted.

The Committee found great pleasure in assisting these passengers, for they had the true grit.  Such were always doubly welcome.

* * * * *

MARY EPPS, ALIAS EMMA BROWN—­JOSEPH AND ROBERT ROBINSON.

A SLAVE MOTHER LOSES HER SPEECH AT THE SALE OF HER CHILD—­BOB ESCAPES FROM HIS MASTER, A TRADER, WITH $1500 IN NORTH CAROLINA MONEY.

Mary fled from Petersburg and the Robinsons from Richmond.  A fugitive slave law-breaking captain by the name of B., who owned a schooner, and would bring any kind of freight that would pay the most, was the conductor in this instance.  Quite a number of passengers at different times availed themselves of his accommodations and thus succeeded in reaching Canada.

His risk was very great.  On this account he claimed, as did certain others, that it was no more than fair to charge for his services—­indeed he did not profess to bring persons for nothing, except in rare instances.  In this matter the Committee did not feel disposed to interfere directly in any way, further than to suggest that whatever understanding was agreed upon by the parties themselves should be faithfully adhered to.

Many slaves in cities could raise, “by hook or by crook,” fifty or one hundred dollars to pay for a passage, providing they could find one who was willing to risk aiding them.  Thus, while the Vigilance Committee of Philadelphia especially neither charged nor accepted anything for their services, it was not to be expected that any of the Southern agents could afford to do likewise.

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The Underground Railroad from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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