The Underground Railroad eBook

William Still
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,197 pages of information about The Underground Railroad.
P.S.  Write as soon as possible for I wish very much to hear from you.  I understand that Mrs. Hunt has been to Richmond, Va. be so kind as to ask her if she heard anything about that money.  Give my love to all inquiring friends and to your family especially.  I now thank God that I have not lost a day in sickness since I came to Canada.
Kiss the baby for me.  I know you are busy but I hope you will have time to write a few lines to me to let me know how you and your family are getting on.  No more at present, but I am yours very truly,

    STEPNEY BROWN, per Jas. A. Walkinshaw.

    BRANTFORD, Oct. 25, ’60

DEAR SIR:—­I take the pleasure of dropping you a few lines, I am yet residing in Brantford and I have been to work all this summer at the falls and I have got along remarkably well, surely God is good to those that put their trust in him I suppose you have been wondering what has become of me but I am in the lands of living and long to hear from you and your family.  I would have wrote sooner, but the times has been such in the states I have not but little news to send you and I’m going to school again this winter and will you be pleased to send me word what has become of Julius Anderson and the rest of my friends and tell him I would write to him if I knew where to direct the letter, please send me word whether any body has been along lately that knows me.  I know that you are busy but you must take time and answer this letter as I am anxious to hear from you, but nevertheless we must not forget our maker, so we cannot pray too much to our lord so I hope that mr.  Anderson has found peace with God for me myself really appreciate that hope that I have in Christ, for I often find myself in my slumber with you and I hope we will meet some day.  Mr. Dungy sends his love to you I suppose you are aware that he is married, he is luckier than I am or I must get a little foothold before I do marry if I ever do.  I am in a very comfortable room all fixed for the winter and we have had one snow.  May the lord be with you and all you and all your household.

    I remain forever your brother in Christ,

    STEPNEY BROWN.

ARRIVAL FROM MARYLAND, 1859.

JIM KELL, CHARLES HEATH, WILLIAM CARLISLE, CHARLES RINGGOLD, THOMAS MAXWELL, AND SAMUEL SMITH.

On the evening of the Fourth of July, while all was hilarity and rejoicing the above named very interesting fugitives arrived from the troubled district, the Eastern shore, of Maryland, where so many conventions had been held the previous year to prevent escapes; where the Rev. Samuel Green had been convicted and sent to the penitentiary for ten years for having a copy of Uncle Tom’s Cabin in his humble home; where so many parties, on escaping, had the good sense and courage to secure their flight by bringing their masters’ horses and carriages a good way on their perilous journey.

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Project Gutenberg
The Underground Railroad from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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