The Underground Railroad eBook

William Still
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,197 pages of information about The Underground Railroad.

From Dick’s story, it appeared that he had seen hard times in North Carolina, under a man he designated by the name of Richard Smallwood.  He was a farmer, living near Wheldon.  One of the faults that he found with Smallwood was, that he was a “tough, drinking man”—­he also charged him with holding “two hundred and sixty slaves in bonds,” the most of whom he came in possession of through his wife.  “She,” Dick thought “was pretty fair.”  He said that no slave had any reason to look for any other than hard times under his master, according to what he had seen and known since he had been in the “institution,” and he fancied that his chances for observation had been equally as good as the great majority of slaves.  Young as he was, Dick had been sold three times already, and didn’t know how much oftener he might have to submit to the same fate if he remained; so, in order to avoid further trouble, he applied his entire skill to the grand idea of making his way to Canada.

Manfully did he wrestle with difficulty after difficulty, until he finally happily triumphed and reached Philadelphia in a good condition—­that is, he was not sick, but he was without money—­home—­education or friends, except as he found them among strangers.  He was hopeful, nevertheless.

Murray Young was also of the unmixed-blood class, and only twenty-one years of age.  The spirit of liberty in him was pretty largely developed.  He entertained naught against Dr. Lober, of Newcastle, but rather against the Doctor’s wife.  He said that he could get along pretty well with the Doctor, but, he could not get along with Mrs. Lober.  But the very idea of Slavery was enough for him.  He did not mean to work for any body for nothing.

Andrew Bolden was still younger than Charles Murray, being only eighteen years of age, but he was very well grown, and on the auction-block he would, doubtless, have brought a large price.  He fled from Newark.  His story contained nothing of marked importance.

ARRIVAL FROM MARYLAND.

JOHN JANNEY, TALBOT JOHNSON, SAM GROSS, PETER GROSS, JAMES HENRY JACKSON, AND SAM SMITH.

    $1.000 REWARD.—­Ran away from the subscriber, August 14th, two
    negro men, viz: 

    [Illustration:  ]

    BILL HUTTON,

    aged 48 or 50 years, dark brown, round face, 5 feet 7 or 8
    inches high, rather stout, has a waddling walk, and small bald
    spot on the top of his head.

    TALBOT JOHNSON,

    aged about 35, is black, spare, and lean-visaged, about 5 feet
    10 inches high, has lost some of his front teeth, leans forward
    as he walks.

    If taken in a slave State I will give $200 each for their
    recovery.  For their recovery from a free State I will give
    one-half their value.

    B.D.  BOND,

    Port Republic, Md.

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The Underground Railroad from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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