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William Still
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,197 pages of information about The Underground Railroad.

In the meanwhile the brothers had passed safely on to New Bedford, but Clarissa remained secluded, “waiting for the storm to subside.”  Keeping up courage day by day, for seventy-five days, with the fear of being detected and severely punished, and then sold, after all her hopes and struggles, required the faith of a martyr.  Time after time, when she hoped to succeed in making her escape, ill luck seemed to disappoint her, and nothing but intense suffering appeared to be in store.  Like many others, under the crushing weight of oppression, she thought she “should have to die” ere she tasted liberty.  In this state of mind, one day, word was conveyed to her that the steamship, City of Richmond, had arrived from Philadelphia, and that the steward on board (with whom she was acquainted), had consented to secrete her this trip, if she could manage to reach the ship safely, which was to start the next day.  This news to Clarissa was both cheering and painful.  She had been “praying all the time while waiting,” but now she felt “that if it would only rain right hard the next morning about three o’clock, to drive the police officers off the street, then she could safely make her way to the boat.”  Therefore she prayed anxiously all that day that it would rain, “but no sign of rain appeared till towards midnight.”  The prospect looked horribly discouraging; but she prayed on, and at the appointed hour (three o’clock—­before day), the rain descended in torrents.  Dressed in male attire, Clarissa left the miserable coop where she had been almost without light or air for two and a half months, and unmolested, reached the boat safely, and was secreted in a box by Wm. Bagnal, a clever young man who sincerely sympathized with the slave, having a wife in slavery himself; and by him she was safely delivered into the hands of the Vigilance Committee.

Clarissa Davis here, by advice of the Committee, dropped her old name, and was straightway christened “Mary D. Armstead.”  Desiring to join her brothers and sister in New Bedford, she was duly furnished with her U.G.R.R. passport and directed thitherward.  Her father, who was left behind when she got off, soon after made his way on North, and joined his children.  He was too old and infirm probably to be worth anything, and had been allowed to go free, or to purchase himself for a mere nominal sum.  Slaveholders would, on some such occasions, show wonderful liberality in letting their old slaves go free, when they could work no more.  After reaching New Bedford, Clarissa manifested her gratitude in writing to her friends in Philadelphia repeatedly, and evinced a very lively interest in the U.G.R.R.  The appended letter indicates her sincere feelings of gratitude and deep interest in the cause—­

    NEW BEDFORD, August 26, 1855.

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