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William Still
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,197 pages of information about The Underground Railroad.

Thomas escaped from Baltimore.  He described the man from whom he fled as a “rum drinker” of some note, by the name of Benjamin Walmsly, and he testified that under him he was neither “half fed nor clothed,” in consequence of which he was dissatisfied, and fled to better his condition.  Luckily Thomas succeeded in making his escape when about twenty-one years of age.  His appearance and smartness indicated resolution and gave promise of future success.  He was well made and of a chestnut color.

Sauney Pry came from Loudon Co., Va.  He had been one of the “well-cared for,” on the farm of Nathan Clapton, who owned some sixty or seventy slaves.  Upon inquiry as to the treatment and character of his master, Sauney unhesitatingly described him as a “very mean, swearing, blustering man, as hard as any that could be started.”  It was on this account that he was prompted to turn his face against Virginia and to venture on the Underground Rail Road.  Sauney was twenty-seven years of age, chestnut color, medium size, and in intellect was at least up to the average.

Benjamin Ducket came from Bell Mountain, Prince George’s Co., Maryland.  He stated to the Committee that he escaped from one Sicke Perry, a farmer.  Of his particular master he spoke thus:  “He was one of the baddest men about Prince George; he would both fight and kill up.”

These characteristics of the master developed in Ben very strong desires to get beyond his reach.  In fact, his master’s conduct was the sole cause of his seeking the Underground Rail Road.  At the time that he came to Philadelphia, he was recorded as twenty-three years of age, chestnut color, medium size, and wide awake.  He left his father, mother, two brothers, and three sisters, owned by Marcus Devoe.

About the same time that the passengers just described received succor, Elizabeth Lambert, with three children, reached the Committee.  The names of the children were, Mary, Horace, and William Henry, quite marketable-looking articles.

They fled from Middletown, Delaware, where they had been owned by Andrew Peterson.  The poor mother’s excuse for leaving her “comfortable home, free board, and kind-hearted master and mistress,” was simply because she was tired of such “kindness,” and was, therefore, willing to suffer in order to get away from it.

Hill Jones, a lad of eighteen, accompanied Elizabeth with her children from Middletown.  He had seen enough of Slavery to satisfy him that he could never relish it.  His owner was known by the name of John Cochran, and followed farming.  He was of a chestnut color, and well-grown.

ARRIVALS IN APRIL, 1856.

CHARLES HALL, JAMES JOHNSON, CHARLES CARTER, GEORGE, AND JOHN LOGAN, JAMES HENRY WATSON, ZEBULON GREEN, LEWIS, AND PETER BURRELL, WILLIAM WILLIAMS, AND HIS WIFE—­HARRIET TUBMAN, WITH FOUR PASSENGERS.

Charles Hall.  This individual was from Maryland, Baltimore Co., where “black men had no rights which white men were bound to respect,” according to the decision of the late Chief Justice Taney of the Supreme Court of the United States.

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