The Underground Railroad eBook

William Still
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,197 pages of information about The Underground Railroad.

    P.S.  I would like to know what became of Johnson,[A] the man
    whose foot was smashed by jumping off the cars, he was at your
    house when I was there.

    [Footnote A:  Johnson was an unfortunate young fugitive, who,
    while escaping, beheld his master or pursuer in the cars, and
    jumped therefrom, crushing his feet shockingly by the bold act.]

    H.E.

FROM VIRGINIA, MARYLAND, DELAWARE, NORTH CAROLINA, WASHINGTON, D.C., AND SOUTH CAROLINA.

JAMES BURRELL, DANIEL WIGGINS, WM. ROBINSON, EDWARD PEADEN, AND WIFE,
ALEX BOGGS, SAMUEL STATER, HARRISON BELL AND DAUGHTER, HARRIET
ANN,DANIEL DAVIS, alias DAVID SMITH, JAMES STEWART, alias WILLIAM
JACKSON, HARRIET HALEY, alias ANN RICHARDSON, BENJ.  DUNCANS, alias
GEORGE SCOTT, MOSES WINES, SARAH SMITH, alias MILDRETH PAGE, LUCY
GARRETT, alias JULIA WOOD, ELLEN FORMAN, alias ELIZABETH YOUNG, WM.
WOODEN, alias WM. NELSON, JAMES EDWARD HANDY, alias DENNIS CANNON,
JAMES HENRY DELANY alias SMART STANLEY, JAMES HENRY BLACKSON, GEORGE
FREELAND, MILES WHITE, LOUISA CLAYTON, LEWIS SNOWDEN, alias LEWIS
WILLIAMS, WM. JOHNSON, JOHN HALL alias JOHN SIMPSON.  In order to keep
this volume within due limits, in the cases to be noticed in this
chapter, it will be impossible to state more than a few of the
interesting particulars that make up these narratives.  While some of
these passengers might not have been made in the prison house to drink
of the bitter cup as often as others, and in their flight might not have
been called upon to pass through as severe perils as fell to the lot of
others, nevertheless justice seems to require, that, as far as possible,
all the passengers passing over the Philadelphia Underground Rail Road
shall be noticed.

James Burrell.  James was certainly justifiable in making his escape, if for no other reason than on the score of being nearly related to the chivalry of the South.  He was a mulatto (the son of a white man evidently), about thirty-two years of age, medium size, and of an agreeable appearance.  He was owned by a maiden lady, who lived at Williamsburg, but not requiring his services in her own family, she hired him out by the year to a Mr. John Walker, a manufacturer of tobacco, for which she received $120 annually.  This arrangement was not satisfactory to James.  He could not see why he should be compelled to wear the yoke like an ox.  The more he thought over his condition, the more unhappy was his lot, until at last he concluded, that he could not stand Slavery any longer.  He had witnessed a great deal of the hardships of the system of Slavery, and he had quite enough intelligence to portray the horrors thereof in very vivid colors.  It was the auction-block horror that first prompted him to seek freedom.  While thinking how he would manage to get away safely,

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The Underground Railroad from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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