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The Underground Railroad eBook

William Still
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,197 pages of information about The Underground Railroad.
come out of that condition?  Mrs. M. have told me that she given some directions how he could be goten at, but friend Still, if this conductor should not be successfull this time, will you mind him of the Poor Slave again.  I hope you will as Mrs. Mercer have told the friend what to do I cannot do more, therefore I must leve it to the Mercy of God and your Exertion.
The weather have been very mile Ever since the 23rd of Dec.  I have thought considerable about our condition in this country Seeing that the weather was so very faverable to us.  I was thinking a few days ago, that nature had giving us A country & adopted all things Sutable.

    You will do me the kindness of telling me in your next whether
    or not the ten slaves have been Brought out from N.C.

I have not hard from Brown for Nine month he have done some very Bad letting me alone, for what cause I cannot tell.  Give my Best Respect to Mr. B. when you see him.  I wish very much to hear from himself and family.  You will please to let me hear from you.  My wife Joines me in love to yourself and family.

    Yours most Respectfully,

    JOHN H. HILL.

    P.S.  Every fugitive Regreated to hear of the Death of Mrs.
    Moore.  I myself think that there are no other to take her Place.

    yours

    J.H.H.

ELEVENTH LETTER.

[EXTRACT.]

Rejoices at hearing of the success of the Underground Rail Road—­Inquires particularly after the “fellow” who “cut off the Patrol’s head in Maryland.”

    HAMILTON, August 15th, 1856.

DEAR FRIEND:—­I am very glad to hear that the Underground Rail Road is doing such good business, but tell me in your next letter if you have seen the heroic fellow that cut off the head of the Patrol in Maryland.  We wants that fellow here, as John Bull has a great deal of fighting to do, and as there is a colored Captain in this city, I would seek to have that fellow Promoted, Provided he became a soldier.

    Great respect,

    JOHN H. HILL.

    P.S.—­Please forward the enclosed to Mr. McCray.

TWELFTH LETTER.

[EXTRACT.]

Believes in praying for the Slave—­but thinks “fire and sword” would be more effective with Slave-holders.

    HAMILTON, Jan. 5th, 1857.

MR. STILL:—­Our Pappers contains long details of insurrectionary movements among the slaves at the South and one paper adds that a great Nomber of Generals, Captains with other officers had being arrested.  At this day four years ago I left Petersburg for Richmond to meet the man whom called himself my master, but he wanted money worser that day than I do this day, he took me to sell me, he could not have done a better thing
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