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William Still
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 1,197 pages of information about The Underground Railroad.

The following extract, taken from a letter of a subsequent date, in addition to the above letter, throws still further light upon the heart-rending affair, and shows Mr. Johnston’s deep sympathy with the sufferers and the oppressed generally—­

EXTRACT OF A LETTER FROM REV.  N.R.  JOHNSTON.

My heart bleeds when I think of those poor, hunted and heart-broken fugitives, though a most interesting family, taken back to bondage ten-fold worse than Egyptian.  And then poor Concklin!  How my heart expanded in love to him, as he told me his adventures, his trials, his toils, his fears and his hopes!  After hearing all, and then seeing and communing with the family, now joyful in hopes of soon seeing their husband and father in the land of freedom; now in terror lest the human blood-hounds should be at their heels, I felt as though I could lay down my life in the cause of the oppressed.  In that hour or two of intercourse with Peter’s family, my heart warmed with love to them.  I never saw more interesting young men.  They would make Remonds or Douglasses, if they had the same opportunities.

    While I was with them, I was elated with joy at their escape,
    and yet, when I heard their tale of woe, especially that of the
    mother, I could not suppress tears of deepest emotion.

My joy was short-lived.  Soon I heard of their capture.  The telegraph had been the means of their being claimed.  I could have torn down all the telegraph wires in the land.  It was a strange dispensation of Providence.
On Saturday the sad news of their capture came to my ears.  We had resolved to go to their aid on Monday, as the trial was set for Thursday.  On Sabbath, I spoke from Psalm xii. 5.  “For the oppression of the poor, for the sighing of the needy, now will I arise,” saith the Lord:  “I will set him in safety from him that puffeth at (from them that would enslave) him.”  When on Monday morning I learned that the fugitives had passed through the place on Sabbath, and Concklin in chains, probably at the very time I was speaking on the subject referred to, my heart sank within me.  And even yet, I cannot but exclaim, when I think of it—­O, Father! how long ere Thou wilt arise to avenge the wrongs of the poor slave!  Indeed, my dear brother, His ways are very mysterious.  We have the consolation, however, to know that all is for the best.  Our Redeemer does all things well.  When He hung upon the cross, His poor broken hearted disciples could not understand the providence; it was a dark time to them; and yet that was an event that was fraught with more joy to the world than any that has occurred or could occur.  Let us stand at our post and wait God’s time.  Let us have on the whole armor of God, and fight for the right, knowing, that though we may fall in battle, the victory will be ours, sooner or later.

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