Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 148 pages of information about The Young Seigneur.

(Cries of “Oui, Oui,” “Notre frere!” and “Notre Chamilly!”)

“Mr. Grandmoulin speaks a falsehood of perhaps not less importance in his assertion that the English are oppressing us.  Where is the oppression of which he makes cry?  The very existence of each of you in his full liberty and speaking French ought to be a sufficient argument.  Speak, act, worship, buy, sell,—­who hinders us so long as we obey the laws?  Would you like a stronger evidence of our freedom?  Grandmoulin himself presents it when he proclaims his violent incitations!  Of oppression by our good fellow-citizens, let then no more be said.—­”

“The object of Mr. Grandmoulin in these bold falsifications is I think sufficiently suspected by you, when you have it on the evidence of your senses that they are invented.  Let us leave both them and him aside and keep ourselves free to examine that theme of far transcending importance, the true position of the French-Canadians.”

“What is our true position?  Is it to be a people of Ishmaelites, who see in every stranger an enemy, who, having rejected good-will, shall have chosen to be those whose existence is an intrigue—­a people accepting no ideas, and receiving no benefits?  Will they be happy in their hatred?  Will they progress?  Will they be permitted to exist?”

“Or shall their ideas be different?  Tell me, ye who are of them; is it more natural or not that they shall open their generous hearts to everyone who will be their friend, their minds to every idea, their conceptions to the noon-day conception of the fraternity of mankind, liberty, equality, good-will?  Is it more natural or not that we should find pride in a country and a nation which have accepted our name and history, and are constantly seeking our citizen-like affection to make the union with us complete?  French-Canadians, the honor of this Dominion, which promises to be one of the greatest nations of the earth, is peculiarly yours.  You are of the race which were the first to call themselves Canadians!  The interests of your children are bound up in its being; your honor in its conduct; your glory in its success.  Work for it, think on it, pray for it; let no illusion render you untrue to it:  beware of the enemy who would demolish the foundation of one patriotism under pretext of laying the stones of another.”

“Canadians!”—­He lingered on the sound with tones of striking richness which sank into the hearts of his hearers.  “Canadians!—­Great title of the future, syllable of music, who is it that shall hear it in these plains in centuries to come, and shall forget the race who chose it, and gave it to the hundred peoples who arrive to blend in our land?  To your stock the historic part and the gesture of respect is assigned, from the companies of the incoming stream.  My brothers, let us be benign, and accept our place of honor.  Identify yourselves with a nation vaster than your race, and cultivate your talents to put you at its head.”

Follow Us on Facebook